SPANISH & 9 Reasons Why The Spanish Language Isn’t ‘Foreign’ In The United States (or to @WesleySeminary)

Commentary by Dr. Whitesel: Our seminary is the only seminary in North America that offers an entire MDiv degree in Spanish. We do so to serve our Spanish-speaking colleagues. Yet few people realize that Spanish was spoken in the United States before English and that there are more Spanish speakers in the United States than in Spain. For seven more reasons why Spanish is an important language for church leaders to learn, read this helpful article.

Why The Spanish Language Isn’t ‘Foreign’ In The United States

by Roque Planas, Huffington Post, 8/9/16.

Anyone who’s ever enrolled in a Spanish class knows that schools generally refer to it as a “foreign language.” Most of us repeat the phrase uncritically, as if it were actually true. But is it?

Take a look around. Spanish isn’t “foreign” to the United States, at all. The names of many of our states and cities are Spanish — a testament to the fact that Spanish-speakers colonized many areas that later became part of the United States before English-speakers. Many of us use Spanish words when speaking English, often without being aware of what we’re doing. According to a 2013 Pew report, Spanish is the second-most spoken language in the country and many people, both immigrant and native-born, were raised speaking it.

When you really think about it, Spanish is no more “foreign” to the United States than English. Still not convinced? Allow us to break it down for you a bit. Here are nine reasons why Spanish is really is not a foreign language in the U.S…

Read the nine reasons at … http://m.huffpost.com/us/author/roque-planas

DIVERSITY & A Portrait of the Adult Children of Immigrants #PewResearch

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by Pew Research, 2/7/13

“Second-generation Americans—the 20 million adult U.S.-born children of immigrants—are substantially better off than immigrants themselves on key measures of socioeconomic attainment, according to a new Pew Research Center analysis of U.S. Census Bureau data. They have higher incomes; more are college graduates and homeowners; and fewer live in poverty. In all of these measures, their characteristics resemble those of the full U.S. adult population.”

Read more at… http://www.pewsocialtrends.org/2013/02/07/second-generation-americans/

HISPANICS & When Labels Don’t Fit: A Conversation About Identity #PewResearch

Commentary by Dr. Whitesel: “Research indicates that many Hispanic and Latino Americans lean more towards being “dissonant adapters” rather than “consonant adapters.” This means our churches must respect their cultures and language by giving them equal access and privilege in our congregations. For more on this see my explanations on how this can foster healthy churches in ORGANIX (the chapter called “Graffiti” about the colorful ethnic mix America is becoming).”

When Labels Don’t Fit: Hispanics and Their Views of Identity by PAUL TAYLOR, MARK HUGO LOPEZ, JESSICA MARTÍNEZ and GABRIEL VELASCO, Pew Research, 4/4/12

“Nearly four decades after the United States government mandated the use of the terms ‘Hispanic’ or ‘Latino’ to categorize Americans who trace their roots to Spanish-speaking countries, a new nationwide survey of Hispanic adults finds that these terms still haven’t been fully embraced by Hispanics themselves. A majority (51%) say they most often identify themselves by their family’s country of origin; just 24% say they prefer a pan-ethnic label.

Hispanics are also divided over how much of a common identity they share with other Americans. About half (47%) say they consider themselves to be very different from the typical American. And just one-in-five (21%) say they use the term ‘American’ most often to describe their identity. On these two measures, U.S.-born Hispanics (who now make up 48% of Hispanic adults in the country) express a stronger sense of affinity with other Americans and America than do immigrant Hispanics.”Moreover, by a ratio of more than two-to-one (69% versus 29%), survey respondents say that the more than 50 million Latinos in the U.S. have many different cultures rather than a common culture. Respondents do, however, express a strong, shared connection to the Spanish language. More than eight-in-ten (82%) Latino adults say they speak Spanish, and nearly all (95%) say it is important for future generations to continue to do so.

Read more at … http://www.pewhispanic.org/2012/04/04/when-labels-dont-fit-hispanics-and-their-views-of-identity/