ANGER & Don’t tweet or reply when you are angry. Instead do what Abe Lincoln did: vent pent-up rage by writing it down … then put it aside for 24 hrs.

by Carmine Gallo, Inc. Magazine, 11/6/18.

…when Lincoln was angry at a cabinet member, a colleague or one of his generals in the Union army, he would write a letter venting all of his pent-up rage. Then–and this is the key–he put it aside.

Hours later or the next day, he would look at the letter again so he could “attend to the matter with a clearer eye.” More often than not, he didn’t send the letter. We know this was Lincoln’s tactic because years after his death historians discovered a trove of letters with the notation: never sent and never signed.

Lincoln practiced this habit for three reasons. First, he didn’t want to inflame already heated passions. Second, he realized that words said in haste aren’t always clear-headed and well-considered. Third, he did it as a signal–a learning opportunity–for others on his now famous “team of rivals.”

In one example, Goodwin recounts the story of Lincoln patiently listening to his secretary of war, Edwin Stanton, who had worked himself into a fury against one of the generals. Once Stanton was done venting, Lincoln suggested that he vent on paper, and write a letter to the general. It must have been quite a letter because it took Stanton two days to write. He brought it to Lincoln who said, “Now that you feel better, throw it in the basket. That is all that is necessary.” Stanton wasn’t pleased, but he took Lincoln’s advice…

Read more at … https://www.inc.com/carmine-gallo/its-easy-to-fire-off-an-angry-tweet-or-email-take-abraham-lincolns-brilliant-advice-instead.html

SOCIAL MEDIA & #NathanClark the leader of one of the nation’s first online communities tells the best thing a small church can do to connect & minister online.

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Commentary by Dr. Whitesel: Nathan Clark is the online minister of Northland Church in Orlando, which was one of the nation’s first churches in the nation that embraced online community.  Here is what I learned from Nathan’s presentation at the Great Commission Research Network annual meeting Oct. 19, 2018 at Asbury Theological Seminary, Orlando, FL.

How does a large church do online ministry?

Large Church (300+).

In a large church, you can stream your Sunday service.  Northland Church does, and its megachurch stature means it can offer a level of followthrough and excellence that makes the streaming of worship work.

  • Use a live chat with church counselors to interact with the watchers during your live services.
  • Make your goal to get people into a face-to-face experience.
    • There are churches in the neighborhoods of almost all online watchers.
    • Create a system to connect online watchers to connect with Christians in their local community (which Nathan calls an “offline church.”
    • To connect people to a local “offline” congregation, Nathan suggests three steps:
      1. “We tell people to look around for people that exemplify the fruit of the Holy Spirit, ‘the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, generosity, faithfulness, gentleness, self-control. Against such there is no law” (Gal. 5:22-23).
      2. Go to them and hang around with them.
  • Ask where they go to church and go with them.

How does a small church do online ministry?

Small Church (300 or less)

  • A small church should not try to stream their Sunday service.
    • According to Nathan it is too expensive.
    • The support and followthrough needs to be trained and extensive.
    • And the overly large territory you will reach (potentially hundreds of watchers) is beyond the person-power and financial ability of a small church.
  • Instead a small church pastor/leader should …
    • Check Facebook 30 minutes every day.
    • Call people on the phone if you see they have a need.
      • Don’t just like their post or tweet, that means very little – only that you noticed.
      • Instead, talk to them on the phone and pray for them.

SOCIAL MEDIA & How a Toronto church plant uses gaming site Twitch to create online bible studies & community.

Commentary by Dr. Whitesel: Here is how Waypoint Church in Toronto, CA uses the gaming site Twitch to create community and online bible study.

When we first felt the call to a start a new church in the city of Toronto we knew right off the bat that two things were going to play a major factor: space and time. In a big city find a place to meet is hard. Most shops do not have the room for people to just hang out. Not to mention that you could spend up to 30 minutes traveling to a church, or meeting place. Because of this geographical need, we said we would want to take full use of media. Our first idea was to start podcasts, which can be found on our website. With over 80 hours a week in transit alone, it is a great way to connect with scripture.

Our second idea was to have online bible studies, where people could interact. Ask questions, make comments, really dig deeper into the subject being covered. Of course we want to have groups meeting in person, but that is not always possible. Our first Waypoint (a group that meets to study scripture) will be taking place on Twitch, a gaming network. Each week we will be going deeper into the passage or topic talked about in that weeks podcast. It is a great way to interact and dig deeper. Our hope is that we will have people engaging in the faith and leaning more and more how they can be transformed by the power of Christ.
So if you know someone who would be interested let them know they can join us on Twitch starting October 23rd @ 7:30pm EST.

SOCIAL MEDIA & Questions to stimulate discussion on how churches can more effectively utilize social media.

PANEL HANDOUTS:

GCRN 2018 Great Commission Research Network, Asbury Theological Seminary, Orlando, Oct. 18, 2018

Praxis Meets Theology: A Panel on Practicing Reconciliation Electronically.

Moderator: Bob Whitesel DMin PhD, McGavran Award recipient & former GCRN president, Consultant/coach at ChurchHealth.net

Schedule: 

3:00 – 3:45 PM panel is interviewed

3:45 – 4:15 PM praxis groups study application questions speakers provided

4:15 – 4:30 PM minute break for snacks

4:30 – 5:00 PM praxis groups report on application ideas

Questions for discussion in praxis groups. Each group pick one or two to report after the break.

Questions by Clyde Taber, http://visualstory.org, Projects Worked On Damah Film Festival, “Jesus: Fact or Fiction?” DVD, the_Oracle CD Rom, Magdalena: Released from Shame (feature), Creativity Summit (event), Visual Story Network. Roles / Skill Sets Producer, networker

What God story do you have from the last week? How can you share it in the world of social media?

Questions by Matt Cruz, using Facebook and social media, his videos of witnessing and encouragement reached over 60 million people in less than one year. Doors began to open for Matt to travel and share his radical faith all over the United States by co-founding the RiseUp Movement.

How can you use live applications in social media for prayer, daily edification, teaching, witnessing, healing, or deliverance for disciple making purposes?

What ways can you build relationship online?

Questions by Dr. Jan Paron, her work reflects experience in urban ministry and leadership, diversity, strategic planning, grant writing, children and adult literacy, teaching children of poverty, differentiating instruction, and curriculum development. Currently, she is a dean and professor with the All Nations Leadership Institute. She was one of the Institute’s founding members.

In what ways can you use social media applications to support spiritual transformation? 

In what ways can you use social media applications to meet needs of non-churchgoers?

Questions by Nils Smith, Chief Strategist of Social Media and Innovation at Dunham and Company. Over the past decade he has been active online in maximizing web resources to further ministries through: Social Media Consulting and Conference Speaking, Co-Hosting the Social Media Church Podcast, Creating courses in the Church Technology Guide, Social Media Church University, & Amplify Social Media Academy. Helping to optimize churches and ministries in search results using Searchable Church.

Download the handout WHITESEL PANEL Handout.

#GCRN18 #GCRN #GreatCommissionResearchNetwork

SOCIAL MEDIA & Don’t forget to get a ________.church URL for easy access by seekers. Thx @djchuang: “always thinking digital first”

Commentary by Dr. Whitesel:  Since my colleague D. J. Chuang made me aware of the availability of ________.church URLs I have suggested them to my clients and clinic attendees. Here is a testimony from one of my Kingswood University graduate students.

Begin forwarded message:
Subject: ffw.church
Date: August 22, 2018 at 10:20:42 PM EDT
To: “Bob Whitesel D.Min. Ph.D.” <bob@churchhealth.net>
Dr. Whitesel,

I wanted to write and let you know that I’m doing all I can to put all I learned from your class into motion.  I turned in my Capstone Project and now I’m engaging people with a whole new perspective.
I want to share with you our newest technological invention for our church.  We now have a “.church” website.  I wanted to share this with you.  I must have said check out ffw.church a thousand times at church tonight.
It is truly exciting.
www.ffw.church    

Respectfully, 

Garry W. McClendon
These URLs are available through the typical domain services (such as GoDaddy, etc.).

SOCIAL MEDIA & Should churches follow Gen Z into virtual spaces? Experts say yes – if they are willing to commit time, money & staff.

by Jeff Brumley, Baptist News Global, 6/19/18.

…Data recently released by the Pew Research Center shows Facebook rates fourth behind YouTube, Instagram and Snapchat among young people.

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So, should churches with strong Facebook presences follow younger Millennials and the up-and-coming Gen Z into virtual spaces a lot of ministers have barely heard of?

Experts say yes – if they are willing to commit time, money and staff resources to the effort. Leadership must also recognize they may be venturing into territory where hoped-for results, like boosts in attendance, may be elusive.

Simply opening an Instagram or Snapchat account isn’t enough. Ministers must study the platforms and how they work, said Bob Carey, chairman of the department of communication and new media at Gardner-Webb University in Boiling Springs, North Carolina.

Read more at … https://baptistnews.com/article/churches-must-count-the-cost-of-pursuing-youth-on-social-media/#.WypkvhYpDDs

#GCRN18 #GreatCommissionResearchNetwork

SOCIAL MEDIA & Many Church Services Are Now a Sea of iPhones. And Clergy Members Think That’s Great.

by Ruth Graham, Slate Magazine, 6/12/18.

… Until recently, many churches were that rare 21st -century phenomenon: the organically analog space. In the early years of the iPhone age, they remained tucked away in purses and pockets, and it was vaguely taboo to peek at them during the worship service. But walk into most churches on Sunday morning now, and you’ll quickly see how much that has changed.

…The most significant shift is the rise of the Scripture app, which for many Christians has replaced hardback or leather-bound Bibles that often approach 1,000 pages. YouVersion, a free non-commercial app that has more than 1,000 languages and translations, was one of the first free apps available when Apple’s app store launched. The app has now been downloaded more than 323 million times. (Other scriptures have their own apps: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints’ Gospel Library app includes Mormon teachings.) YouVersion founder Bobby Gruenewald says he developed YouVersion because he wanted an easy way to read the Bible during the course of the day. But it soon became obvious than many people were using it during worship services. Usage more than doubles on Sunday mornings, Gruenewald says, and new installations of the app spike then, too. “Initially there was a bit of tension,” he recalled, when pastors were prickly about seeing people using their phones in the pews. But in recent years, he said, the complaints have mostly stopped.

… Some clergy members now actively encourage phone usage. “I feel like if the church isn’t using technology, we’re telling Gutenberg, ‘We don’t want your printing press,’ ” said Jim Keat, the associate minister of digital strategy and online engagement at the Riverside Church in Manhattan. He spends Sunday morning live-tweeting events at the church, including snippets from the sermon and prayers. Keat dismissed the idea that phones are problematically distracting to churchgoers. He pointed out that people have been tuning out in churches long before phones existed. And technology, unlike idle daydreaming, can be a vehicle for tuning in, too. People who have stayed home for any reason—illness, shyness, fear, pain—can use social media to peek inside the church doors and be reminded of what’s happening there.

Read more at … https://slate.com/human-interest/2018/06/many-church-services-are-now-a-sea-of-iphones-and-clergy-members-think-thats-great.html