PRODUCTIVITY & Neuroscience Says Power Naps Work. Why Aren’t We Taking Them? #IncMagazine

by Jeffrey James, Inc. Magazine, 9/25/18.

Neuroscientists have known for decades that a “10‐minute nap results in significantly improved alertness and cognitive performance.” We even know from brain scans specifically how napping makes you smarter, better and faster.

Given all that peer-reviewed evidence, you’d think that CEOs–who no doubt want and expect employees to perform at their peak–would be rushing to make it easier for employees to take power naps.

But you’d think wrong. According to the New York Times, many if not most companies are still forcing people to employ subterfuge–like hiding in their cars or in the restroom–simply to take a brief restorative nap.

What gives? Why do naps remain verboten?

The sad truth: as a class, CEOs are notorious for ignoring science in favor of biz-blab and bullsh*t. Rather than relying on peer-reviewed neuroscience into productivity, CEOs have a depressing tendency to glom onto the latest management fad du jour.

It’s very bizarre, if you think about it. If CEOs made financial decisions with the same disrespect for facts that they give to productivity decisions, CEOs would be rubbing gold dust on dollars to ensure the money comes back ten-fold.

Nowhere is this tendency to swallow malarkey more obvious than with the open plan office, which runs contrary to over three decades of research from some of the world’s finest universities reveals that OPOs massively decrease productivity.

Read more at … https://www.inc.com/geoffrey-james/neuroscience-says-power-naps-work-why-arent-we-taking-them.html

NAPPING & Research Links Naps to Greater Work Efficiency

The Efficacy of Naps as a Fatigue Countermeasure: A Meta-Analytic Integration

by James E. Driskell, Florida Maxima Corporation, Winter Park, Florida and Brian Mullen, Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York, Human Factors: The Journal of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Summer 2005 vol. 47 no. 2 360-377.

Abstract

Modern requirements for extended operations in aviation, transportation, the military, and industry have led to extensive research on countermeasures to mitigate the adverse effects of fatigue. The goals of this research were to (a) summarize and integrate existing research on naps as a fatigue countermeasure using metaanalysis, (b) identify the strength and significance of the effects of naps on performance and feelings of fatigue, and (c) identify factors that may moderate the effects of napping as a fatigue countermeasure.

  • The results of these analyses can be used to predict nap efficacy as a function of length of the nap and the postnap interval.
  • The results of these analyses also suggest an approach to work design that takes into account the optimal effects of naps as a fatigue countermeasure.

Actual or potential applications of this research include the development of optimal work schedules to minimize fatigue and increase safety.

Read more at … http://m.hfs.sagepub.com/content/47/2/360.abstract

SLEEP & How Much Sleep Do You Actually Need?

Read more at … http://www.fastcodesign.com/3033637/infographic-of-the-day/your-brain-on-6-hours-of-sleep-a-night?partner=rss

REST: A TED talk In praise of slowness

In praise of slowness
A TED Talk with Carl Honore, 4/05

Journalist Carl Honore believes the Western world’s emphasis on speed erodes health, productivity and quality of life. But there’s a backlash brewing, as everyday people start putting the brakes on their all-too-modern lives.
pinThis talk was presented at an official TED Conference. TED’s editors featured it among our daily selections on the home page.

http://www.ted.com/talks/carl_honore_praises_slowness

REST & Reasons Your Pastor Needs a Sabbatical

Reasons Your Pastor Needs a Sabbatical
by Thom Rainer

“The word ‘sabbatical’ has different meanings depending on the context in which it is used. It has one meaning in the academic community, another meaning in its biblical usage, and still another in many secular settings.

For the purpose of this article, I define sabbatical in simple terms. It simply means time off for rest and/or study. The time can be a few days, a few weeks or, on rare occasions, a few months.

The pastor is given paid leave for rest, rejuvenation and, perhaps, deeper study. I would love to see churches of all sizes provide this requirement of their pastor, even if it’s only for a few days.

I have the opportunity to work with lay leaders and pastors. I have a pretty good view of both perspectives. And I am convinced that more lay leaders need to insist their pastors take regular breaks even beyond vacations…”

Read more at … http://www.churchleaders.com/mobile/pastors/pastor-articles/173243-thom-rainer-reasons-your-pastor-needs-a-sabbatical.html?p=1

LEADERSHIP & Retreats

List of Retreats and Getaways for Church Leaders
by Ed Stetzer

“Recently, I posted to Facebook and tweeted a number of times asking people to share some places where pastors can recharge and be encouraged at a steep discount, or even for free. Pastors need vacation and counseling too, and oftentimes the opportunity for pastors to get away or seek counsel is not readily available or easily affordable. (I’ll be posting the counseling options soon.)

This is not a list I am creating for my family. I (and you can) stay atLifeWay’s Ridgecrest Conference Center. They have a “Minister Getaway” at $44 per night, which is a great way for a pastor’s family to have a nice vacation away from the hustle and bustle of life.

Below is a long list of numerous camps, retreat centers, bed and breakfasts, and otherwise that has discounted or free opportunities for pastors and their families to take some time away from home, away from everything that surrounds leading the people of God. The list is organized by state…”

Read more at … http://www.christianitytoday.com/edstetzer/2014/march/free-or-discounted-getaways-for-pastors.html?paging=off