STUDENT SUCCESS & How to Find Scholarly Articles if You Are a @WesleySeminary Student #OCLS

Commentary by Dr. Whitesel: Sometimes my students have difficulty locating scholarly journal articles. This is because not all scholarly articles have yet to be catalogued by search engines such as Google. However, if you are a Wesley Seminary student we have provided you a quick and easy way to access almost every scholarly journal that has been published. This service is called Off-campus Library Services (OCLS). Here is how they explain the process for downloading (free to Wesley Seminary students) the following article:

Hagley, S.J. (2008, September 1). [Review of the book Organizational change: Theory and practice, by W.W. Burke]. Journal of Religious Leadership 7, no. 2 125-128. 3 pp.

Begin forwarded message:
Date: February 15, 2017 at 7:52:01 PM EST
To: “Whitesel, Bob” <Bob.Whitesel@indwes.edu>

Bob,
Thank you for contacting OCLS. Due to Federal Copyright Law restrictions, we are not able to provide a copy of any article to you for you to distribute to your students. They will need to individually contact us for any articles they need.

However, this particular article is available through our site.

You/they will need to start on the OCLS homepage, www2.indwes.edu/ocls, and click on “Journal Titles” from the “Key Links” section.

In the search box, type in the name of the journal, which is Journal of Religious Leadership, and click on “Search.”

You/they will see that there is only one database through which we have access to this journal: ATLA Religion Database with ATLASerials. Click on the link for that database.

Once you’ve clicked on the database link, you/they will be taken to a new screen. Select “+2008” from the list of years under the “All Issues” section on the far right.

Then select “Volume 7 Issue 2 – Fall 2008.” Scroll down the list of articles from that issue and the one you/they need is number 8. Click on “PDF Full Text” to read the article.

If you or your students have any questions, please let us know. Thank you and have a wonderful evening!

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RESEARCH & A two-minute guide to understanding independent / dependent variables & regression analysis

Commentary by Dr. Whitesel: Even though my students are working in the social sciences, they still must chart regression analyses to support their hunches with facts. Here is Harvard Business Review’s introduction to this important research tool.

The Refresher: Regression Analysis

by Amy Gallo, Harvard Business Review, 11/4/15.

CLICK to watch the 2-minute video > //players.brightcove.net/2071817190001/default_default/index.html?videoId=5299994733001

A two-minute guide to one of the most important types of data analysis. For more, read “A Refresher on Regression Analysis.”   Read more at … https://hbr.org/video/5299994733001/the-refresher-regression-analysisSave

RESEARCH & An Introduction to the Academy for Intercultural Church Research

Commentary by Dr. Whitesel:  I was honored to be involved in the launch of The Academy for Intercultural Church Research, a network of researchers dedicated to analyzing and researching multicultural churches such as multiethnic churches, multi-generational churches, churches reaching out to multiple socioeconomic levels, etc. Below is their home page. Be sure to bookmark it and  check out their journal which features the latest research on congregations that are transitioning into healthy multicultural churches.

AICR Home page picture.jpg

RESEARCH & Summaries of Most Major Studies of No. American Congregations

Commentary by Dr. Whitesel:  This list, curated by Hartford Seminary’s Hartford Institute for Religion Research, is one of the best curated listings of scholarly research available on the web.


“The study of congregations has become a primary focus of sociologists of religion in the past decade.  The local church is now seen by researchers as an important component of an individual’s faith and religious practice in the United States.  The increased role of congregations in American public life makes the study of these local religious organizations increasingly important.

This section offers summaries of major research projects which have the congregation as a focus of study.  They are listed in rough chronological order.”

Others research summaries coming soon.

View congregational survey question bank drawn from the survey instruments of several of the above projects


More research from Hartford Seminary’s Hartford Institute for Religion Research Page (below):

Visit our research section on Megachurches – This section of the site contains research, writings and an extensive database of megachurches in the U.S.

Women and Religion – Information from several studies on the role of women in religion can be found in this section.  Included are links to other web resources on women and religion.

Religion and the Family – Several recent studies on religion and changing family dynamics are highlighted in this section. Information on the family ministries of churches and denominations is also included.

Religion and the Web – The Internet is changing the face of religion. Several articles discussing these changes are included here. This section also has links to sites about religion and the Internet.

Pentecostalism – Pentecostalism is one of the fastest growing religious phenomena in the past century.  Research on religious groups practicing expressive, charismatic worship is described in this section.

Orthodox Churches in the United States – This section has one of a kind research on the major branches of the Orthodox Church in the USA.  It includes tables of fact, articles and links to more information.

Homosexuality and Religion – This section contains information on this controversial topic.  Included here are reports of denominational debates, research data and links to information on this subject.

Quick Questions – Our quick questions section is the archive of factoids drawn from studies and research reports we feature in this web site.  Individual questions are rotated onto our homepage approximately every week.  These questions are intended to highlight the diverse research findings contained on the Institute web site.

Faith Based Social Services/Charitable Choice – Links to research articles and other useful sites are provided here on the subject of congregations providing social services to address issues of the needy within their community.

RESEARCH & Launch meeting of Academy for Intercultural Church Research (AICR)

Launch meeting of Academy for Intercultural Church Research (AICR). Pres. Joanne Solis-Walker, vice-president Urban D, sec/treasurer Oneya Okuwobi, journal editor Andy Merritt.

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RESEARCH & StudyingCongregations.org is One of the Largest Research Sites for Studying Churches

Commentary by Dr. Whitesel: One of the best research sites offering not only tools for studying churches, but also links to relevant scholarly research, is the newly relaunched StudyingCongregations.org. Led by scholars from the University of Boston’s renowned sociology department, check out their church analysis tools and links to scholarly articles at: http://studyingcongregations.org/

“The Studying Congregations Research Collection has hundreds of citations and resources with more being added all the time.” (from studyingcongregations.org)

COLLABORATION & What Happens When You Don’t Work With Others: A Bone to Pick #WSJ

Commentary by Dr. Whitesel: “Academic researchers tend to stay in their academic silos and not participate with other academic disciplines in their research. But research can be more reliable and valid when researchers work with other disciplines to foster ‘inter-disciplinary research.image‘ For example, I recently suggested to my colleagues in the Academy for Evangelism in Theological Education (www.AETE.co) that we conduct our research on evangelism alongside sociologists, psychologists and other interested researchers. This can not only make our research more valid and reliable … but also more helpful. Read this story about the consequences that result when academics stay within their own research silos.”

A Bone to Pick

by NICHOLAS WADE, Wall Street Journal, 6/18/15.

Finding human fossils can be a contact sport, as researchers squeeze out competitors by denouncing them to the local authorities.

In 1912, the British paleoanthropological establishment was deceived into thinking that bones found at Piltdown were those of an early human ancestor. The specimen was promptly named Eoanthropus, or “dawn man,” amid general satisfaction that the earliest human had turned out to be British, not French or German. Perhaps feeling his prank had gone too far, the perpetrator of the Piltdown hoax then salted the site with an artifact that, if human credulity had any reasonable limits, should have brought the show to a close—a piece of elephant bone carved to resemble a cricket bat. But even this startling item was received without dissent, and the Piltdown skull hung around for another 40 years until modern methods proved it to be a forgery.

The Piltdown hoax is recounted in “The Strange Case of the Rickety Cossack” as a lesson in how easily paleoanthropologists—those who study human fossils—can be misled by notions that play to their prejudices. The author, Ian Tattersall, is himself a paleoanthropologist and has watched the antics of his profession for many years from a front-row seat at the American Museum of Natural History. His account of the field raises the wider issue of how, despite the supposed rigor of the scientific method, whole communities of scientists can occasionally be blown far off course by nonscientific motivations.

One of paleoanthropology’s problems, as Mr. Tattersall sees it, has been professional isolation from other sciences. From its beginnings in the 19th century, the subject was dominated by anatomists who paid minute attention to bone shapes and little to taxonomy or other relevant biological disciplines. These anatomists would make oracular pronouncements, which were basically intuitions beyond the reach of scientific analysis. One advised the young Mr. Tattersall that if he stared at the fossils for long enough, the bones would speak to him.

Read more at … http://www.wsj.com/articles/a-bone-to-pick-1434667925