PREACHING & Baylor Univ. releases list of “12 most effective preachers” & my exercise for preachers.

Baylor University conducted a survey to identify the 12 most effective preachers in the English-speaking world. Now, two decades after the original survey, the Kyle Lake Center for Effective Preaching at Baylor University’s George W. Truett Theological Seminary has identified the 12 most effective preachers of 2018.

The 12 individuals named as the most effective preachers in the English-speaking world, according to George W. Truett Theological Seminary’s national survey are … 

12 Most Effective PreachersRead more at … https://www.baylor.edu/truett/index.php?id=951217

A Leadership Exercise by Dr. Whitesel:

Listen to a sermon from 3 to 5 of these preachers. Then write out the similarities you hear. This exercise can help you identify recurring aspects of preachers known for preaching effectiveness.

PREACHING & The Surprising Power of Asking Questions #OrganicChurchBook #HarvardBusinessReview

Commentary by Dr. Whitesel: When researching my Abingdon Press book, “Inside the organic church,” I found growing young churches often have sermons in which the audience is asked to respond to the preacher with live questions. Traditionalists usually found this worrisome, because they feared losing control of the learning experience. But research cited in this Harvard Business Review article demonstrates that asking questions deepens learning.  Not surprisingly, I practice questioning of my listeners in my courses, seminars and even sermons.

by Alison Wood Brooks and Leslie K. John, Harvard Business Review, May-June 2018.

“Be a good listener,” Dale Carnegie advised in his 1936 classic How to Win Friends and Influence People. “Ask questions the other person will enjoy answering.” More than 80 years later, most people still fail to heed Carnegie’s sage advice. When one of us (Alison) began studying conversations at Harvard Business School several years ago, she quickly arrived at a foundational insight: People don’t ask enough questions. In fact, among the most common complaints people make after having a conversation, such as an interview, a first date, or a work meeting, is “I wish [s/he] had asked me more questions” and “I can’t believe [s/he] didn’t ask me any questions.”

…Dating back to the 1970s, research suggests that people have conversations to accomplish some combination of two major goals: information exchange (learning) and impression management (liking). Recent research shows that asking questions achieves both.

… Not all questions are created equal. Alison’s research, using human coding and machine learning, revealed four types of questions: introductory questions (“How are you?”), mirror questions (“I’m fine. How are you?”), full-switch questions (ones that change the topic entirely), and follow-up questions (ones that solicit more information). Although each type is abundant in natural conversation, follow-up questions seem to have special power. They signal to your conversation partner that you are listening, care, and want to know more. People interacting with a partner who asks lots of follow-up questions tend to feel respected and heard.

An unexpected benefit of follow-up questions is that they don’t require much thought or preparation—indeed, they seem to come naturally to interlocutors. In Alison’s studies, the people who were told to ask more questions used more follow-up questions than any other type without being instructed to do so.

Read more at … https://hbr.org/2018/05/the-surprising-power-of-questions

PREACHING & Why a story well-told should elicit in a listener the response, “Oh, tell it again!” #ChristinePartonBurkett

“Some stories need to be told again and again. So it is with the story of Easter, a story that reminds us that we belong to God and that Jesus is out ahead of us, calling us to God’s future…” by Nathan Kirkpatrick, Faith & Leadership, Duke Divinity School, 3/26/18.

My colleague Christine Parton Burkett reminds preachers that children, after hearing a well-told story, never respond, “What does it mean?” Instead, with glee and abandon, they exclaim, “Oh, tell it again!” She reminds preachers that, as human beings, we never really outgrow our love of a story well-told; there is a part of each of us that wants to cheer, “Oh, tell it again!”

Read more at … https://www.faithandleadership.com/nathan-kirkpatrick-tell-it-again?utm_source=NI_newsletter&utm_medium=content&utm_campaign=NI_feature

 

PREACHING & Show it (just don’t tell it): The famous TED talk where Bill Gates let loose a jar filled w/ mosquitos.

 

WOMEN PREACHERS & A description of Susanna Wesley’s innovations

A crowd gathered outside the kitchen window. They had come to hear the pastor’s wife explain Scripture. Tradition forbade women from preaching as a pastor might, but the crowd knew Susanna Wesley as the theological and homiletical equal to her husband, their pastor. On occasions when Samuel traveled to London on religious business, attendance at the Epworth church dropped. But because Susanna believed so strongly people needed a regular feeding of God’s Word, she threw open her kitchen window as an invitation for others to hear the Word. The pretext was that she was teaching her children, gathered around the kitchen table. But the open window allowed her message to touch the hungry hearts of the townspeople. Never before had such delicious provision come out of this kitchen.

Excerpted from Enthusiast! Finding a Faith that Fills (Bob Whitesel, The Wesleyan Publishing House, 2017), p. 135.

PREACHING & Great Presenters Do One Thing That Most of You Don’t, Science Says

by James Sudakow, Inc. Magazine, 1/18/16.

…What if I told you that the thing you spend the most time on when preparing for your big presentation might actually be the thing that influences your audience the least? That’s exactly what a landmark study by Albert Mehrabian, UCLA Professor Emeritus of Psychology, found.

Mehrabian found that there are three elements of communication that influence an audience:

Visual

This is not how cool your power point slides are (although that matters, too). What Mehrabian was referring to here were key things like eye contact, body movement, and gestures. In other words, these are the things that the audience sees you do with your eyes, your hands, your arms, and your entire body…

Vocal

This is all about your voice. The three key areas that are most important are your rate, volume, and inflection. A rate that is too fast makes you seem “junior”, lack of inflection makes you look dispassionate, and lack of volume leaves you sounding less confident.

Verbal

This is simply about content. In this study, Verbal refers to the actual words you are saying. In preparing a presentation, most of us spend a significant amount of time, if not the majority, on Verbal. It makes sense, right? You can’t make a good presentation without good content.

Here is where the research gets really interesting in a way that just might change your approach:

From the study, Verbal accounted for only 7% of what influenced the audience. That left a whopping 93% of audience influence based on Visual and Vocal. Specifically, the study showed that 55% of audience influence was based on Visual and 38% was based on Vocal…

Read more at … http://www.inc.com/james-sudakow/great-presenters-do-one-thing-that-most-of-you-dont-science-says.html

PREACHING & Relevant Topics in an Irreverent World

Commentary by Dr. Whitesel: Vintage Faith Church in Santa Cruz, California continually has some of the most relevant sermons I’ve come across. Here is a link to their latest. If you want to preach in a way that answers people’s questions, you should subscribed to their newsletter (below).

Who is going to win? Who is the greatest? Which one is the best? We are surrounded by people, organizations and cultures who desire influence & power, and it’s easy to get completely swept up in all of that. But what if we have been striving for the wrong thing this whole time?

Join us this Sunday 11/20 to explore what it looks like when we give up power instead of demanding allegiance, when we care for others instead of oppressing them, when we live into the way of Jesus’ upside down kingdom.

**We are excited to be back in our “Gospel According to Luke” series and invite everyone to join us as we continue reading through Luke on a weekly basis.