MIGRATION & A Map of 20th Century Global Migrations

Commentary by Dr. Whitesel: This map by the BBC depicts global population migrations during the first two thirds of the 20th century.

Read more at … http://www.bbc.co.uk/scotland/education/geog/population/migration_map.shtml

MULTIETHIC & What is the second most common language in each country? #DavidDrury

RT @DavidDrury: What is the second most common language in each country? See this infographic. Any surprises? #Migration
http://t.co/yiwVFzIEJH

See more at … http://www.movehub.com/sites/default/files/main_images/second-languages-map-1350px.jpg

CHURCH PLANTING & Migration Patterns by Education Levels in the 20 Largest U.S. Metros

The chart below breaks out the net migration patterns by education levels in the 20 largest U.S. metros.
original.jpg
by ZARA MATHESON, Pew Research Center

The chart shows the very different patterns of migration occurring across America’s metros. Keep in mind that many of the country’s biggest metros are still gaining overall population, as immigrants continue to flow into places like New York and Los Angeles. But these places are seeing a net loss of Americans of all education levels.

The metros that are attracting educated workers include knowledge and tech hubs like San Francisco, Austin, Seattle, and Denver, and also Sunbelt metros like Phoenix, Charlotte, and Miami.

When we look at just those with professional and graduate degrees, the pattern comes into sharper focus. There have been significant net inflows of educated workers to the true meccas of knowledge work: Seattle, San Francisco, D.C., Denver, San Jose, Austin, and Portland, as well as the banking hub of Charlotte.

Larger metros have the edge in attracting and retaining college grads.

These metros, particularly ones with higher costs of living, have been able to attract and retain skilled workers, even while the less-skilled have departed. San Francisco, Los Angeles, Washington, D.C., and Miami all saw their ranks of educated residents grow and less educated residents shrink. Lower-paid workers are being priced out, and the jobs that can attract new residents are reserved for the most educated. Boston is one of the few places attracting and retaining more unskilled workers than skilled ones, a perhaps unexpected trend, given its reputation as a center of education and knowledge work.

The pattern for the less educated looks substantially different. The top ten metros that saw the largest net gains among those with just a high school degree were all in the Sunbelt, including Atlanta, Houston, Phoenix, Las Vegas, and Florida’s Fort Myers, Tampa, and Sarasota. And when we consider those without a high school degree or equivalent, the places with the largest net gains were mainly Sunbelt tourist destinations with thriving service economies like Fort Myers and Daytona Beach, Florida, and Lake Havasu City, Arizona.

Read more at … http://www.citylab.com/work/2014/06/high-school-dropouts-and-college-grads-are-moving-to-very-different-places/372065/

POPULATION & the Global Flow of People #InfoGraphic

FIGURE Global Flow of People http-:www.global-migration.info:?_ga=1.127398341.971829906.1391623979The Global Flow of People
by Nikola Sander, Guy J. Abel & Ramon Bauer
at the Wittgenstein Centre for Demography and Global Human Capital,
Abel & Sander (2014).Quantifying Global International Migration Flows. Science, 343 (6178). (Abstract, Full Text)

Explore new estimates of migration flows between and within regions for five-year periods, 1990 to 2010. Click on a region to discover flows country-by-country.

http://www.global-migration.info/?_ga=1.127398341.971829906.1391623979