SOCIOECONOMICS & African Americans won’t reach white wealth levels for centuries, report says

By Greg LaRose, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune, 8/9/16.

The white population in the United States can expect their wealth to grow $18,000 each year over the next 30 years, while the annual increase for African Americans will be only $750 if current fiscal policies stay in place.

“The Ever Growing Gap,” a study released Tuesday (Aug. 9), examines racial income disparities using data from the Survey of Consumer Finance, a research project of the Federal Reserve Board. The Corporation for Enterprise Development and Institute for Policy Studies used information from 1983 to 2013 to make their projections

Their report defines wealth as more than just extra money in the bank. It includes home ownership, having the means to earn a college degree and save for retirement, and other opportunities that are attainable with savings and investments.

The authors point to tax policies designed to build household wealth, benefit homebuyers, increase retirement savings and start a business — opportunities that are out of reach for the poorest segments of the population.

Looking back, whites saw their average wealth increase 84 percent over the past 30 years — 1.2 times the rate for Latinos and three times the African American growth rate.

If the growth rate stays at the current pace, it would take black families 228 years to accumulate the same wealth that white families have today. For Latino families, the gap would take 84 years to close…

The report frames these disparities in the context of recent deaths of African Americans in police shootings.

“These senseless and violent events have not only given rise to the Black Lives Matter movement, they have also sharpened the nation’s focus on the inequities and structural barriers facing households of color,” the report states.

The authors acknowledge their look at wealth data rather than household income further skews the differences, but they note the gaps still exist when considering median wealth figures.

Changes in household wealth
Black Latino White
1983 $67,000 $58,000 $355,000
2013 $85,000 $98,000 $656,000
Survey of Consumer Finance

The report says a more even distribution of wealth would allow the disadvantaged to “get ahead, rather than just scrape by.”

“Imagine that instead of low-wealth Black and Latino families finding themselves unable to deal with fluctuating incomes or how they’re going to make it through an unexpected financial emergency, they have the freedom to invest in their children’s future aspirations. Or, instead of resorting to selling loose cigarettes or CDs to earn a little more money for their families, Blacks and Latinos have the opportunity to build long-term wealth by owning their own businesses.”

Read more at … http://www.nola.com/business/index.ssf/2016/08/african_americans_latinos_wont.html

SPANISH & 9 Reasons Why The Spanish Language Isn’t ‘Foreign’ In The United States (or to @WesleySeminary)

Commentary by Dr. Whitesel: Our seminary is the only seminary in North America that offers an entire MDiv degree in Spanish. We do so to serve our Spanish-speaking colleagues. Yet few people realize that Spanish was spoken in the United States before English and that there are more Spanish speakers in the United States than in Spain. For seven more reasons why Spanish is an important language for church leaders to learn, read this helpful article.

Why The Spanish Language Isn’t ‘Foreign’ In The United States

by Roque Planas, Huffington Post, 8/9/16.

Anyone who’s ever enrolled in a Spanish class knows that schools generally refer to it as a “foreign language.” Most of us repeat the phrase uncritically, as if it were actually true. But is it?

Take a look around. Spanish isn’t “foreign” to the United States, at all. The names of many of our states and cities are Spanish — a testament to the fact that Spanish-speakers colonized many areas that later became part of the United States before English-speakers. Many of us use Spanish words when speaking English, often without being aware of what we’re doing. According to a 2013 Pew report, Spanish is the second-most spoken language in the country and many people, both immigrant and native-born, were raised speaking it.

When you really think about it, Spanish is no more “foreign” to the United States than English. Still not convinced? Allow us to break it down for you a bit. Here are nine reasons why Spanish is really is not a foreign language in the U.S…

Read the nine reasons at … http://m.huffpost.com/us/author/roque-planas

ETHNICITY & Census considers new approach to asking about race – by not using the term at all #PewRe search

BY D’VERA COHN, Pew Research, 6/19/15.

2020 Census QuestionPossible 2020 census race/Hispanic question for online respondents, who would click to the next screen to choose more detailed sub-categories such as “Cuban” or “Chinese.” Credit: U.S. Census Bureau

The Census Bureau is experimenting with new ways to ask Americans about their race or origin in the 2020 census – including not using the words “race” or “origin” at all. Instead, the questionnaire may tell people to check the “categories” that describe them.

Census officials say they want the questions they ask to be clear and easy, in order to encourage Americans to answer them, so the officials can better collect race and Hispanic data as required by law. But many people are confused by the current wording, or find it misleading or insufficient to describe their identity.

Census forms now have two questions about race and Hispanic origin. The first asks people whether they are of Hispanic, Latino or Spanish origin, and states that “Hispanic origins are not races.” A second question asks, “What is this person’s race?” and includes a list of options with checkboxes and write-in spaces. The U.S. government defines Hispanic as an ethnicity, not a race.

The problem with using the word “race” is that many Americans say they don’t know what it means, and how it is different from “origin.” The agency’s focus group research found that some people think the words mean the same thing, while others see race as meaning skin color, ancestry or culture, while origin is the nation or place where they or their parents were born.

2010 Census Question on Race and Ethnicity2010 census form asks about race and Hispanic ethnicity separately. Credit: U.S. Census Bureau

The Census Bureau’s own definitions of race and Hispanic origin, which follow government-wide rules from the Office of Management and Budget, sometimes appear to overlap. A white person, for example, is defined as someone “having origins in any of the original peoples of Europe, the Middle East or North Africa.” Hispanic is defined as a person of “Spanish culture or origin regardless of race.”

The confusion reflects a larger debate about how to define race, which used to be seen as a fixed physical characteristic and now more commonly is viewed as a fluid product of many influences. “We recognize that race and ethnicity are not quantifiable values,” the Census Bureau said in a 2013 report. “Rather, identity is a complex mix of one’s family and social environment, historical or socio-political constructs, personal experience, context, and many other immeasurable factors.”

Read more at … http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2015/06/18/census-considers-new-approach-to-asking-about-race-by-not-using-the-term-at-all/?utm_source=Pew+Research+Center&utm_campaign=a19d4f9cf5-June_18_Newsletter6_18_2015&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_3e953b9b70-a19d4f9cf5-399907237

MULTIETHNIC & Hispanic congregation outgrows white congregation, muscles into Sunday morning slot #Humor #LarkNews

LANSING — Templo Calvario, a Hispanic church which meets at First Lutheran Church, has outgrown its white host church and seized control of service times.

“We’re bigger, we’re more excited and we’re taking Sunday mornings,” said Fernando Gonzalez, the newly emboldened Hispanic pastor. “They can have 3 p.m. and see how they like it.”

The Templo crew also claimed the main church office, forcing First Lutheran’s staff into broom closets and back rooms which formerly housed Templo’s offices.  Read more at http://www.larknews.com/archives/145

HISPANICS & Catholic Church losing ground in Latin America & US to Protestant Transfer Growth #USAtoday

by Alan Gomez, USA TODAY, 11/13/14

MIAMI — In just one generation, Latin America has seen the number of people who identify themselves as Catholic plummet, with more people becoming Protestant or dropping religion altogether, a new report shows.

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The shift is dramatic for a region that has long been one of the bastions of

Catholicism in the world. With more than 425 million Catholics, Latin America accounts for nearly 40% of the global Catholic population. Through the 1960s, at least 90% of Latin Americans were Catholic, and 84% of people surveyed recently by the Pew Research Center said they were raised Catholic.

But the report released Thursday found that only 69% of Latin Americans still consider themselves Catholic, with more people switching to more conservative Protestant churches (19%) or describing themselves as agnostic or religiously unaffiliated (8%)…

Read more at … http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/world/2014/11/13/latin-america-less-religious-study/18946703/

HISPANICS & Differing Religious Views on Morality by Latin American Country #PewResearch

A Pew Research Center survey of 18 Latin American countries and Puerto Rico asked people whether eight specific behaviors — including homosexual behavior and having an abortion — are morally wrong. Even though Catholic Church teaching forbids some of these behaviors, Protestants across the region are more likely than Catholics to see many of them as morally unacceptable.

Abortion: Clear majorities across the region view abortion as morally wrong. In many countries, Protestants are more likely than Catholics to hold this view.

                     Catholics                              Protestants
Country % Morally
wrong
% Morally acceptable % Morally wrong % Morally acceptable
Argentina 64 11 79 6
Bolivia 86 3 93 3
Brazil 80 2 88 2
Chile 57 8 78 7
Colombia 82 5 90 2
Costa Rica 82 4 88 4
Dominican Republic 90 2 96 2
Ecuador 84 2 95 3
El Salvador 95 1 93 3
Guatemala 94 1 98 1
Honduras 95 2 96 1
Mexico 71 9 78 5
Nicaragua 87 3 94 2
Panama 89 4 91 5
Paraguay 96 * 96 2
Peru 85 3 91 2
Puerto Rico 73 3 80 7
Uruguay 49 19 68 7
Venezuela 84 5 95 3

Source: Pew Research Center survey of 18 Latin American countries and the U.S. territory of Puerto Rico, based on more than 30,000 face-to-face interviews, conducted between October 2013 and February 2014, in Spanish, Portuguese and Guarani.

Read more at … http://www.pewforum.org/interactives/latin-america-morality-by-religion/

LATINO/A & The traditional, married, 2-parent US family that eats home-cooked meals together may be Latino #NPR #PewResearch

by Gene Demby, NPR, 9/28/14

The biggest takeaways from a new study on marriage by the Pew Research Center are these: Fewer Americans who are older than 25 are married than ever before, and by the time they’re middle-aged, a record 25 percent will have never tied the knot.

That might not be too much of a surprise, since marriage rates have been sliding for decades.

But what’s just as interesting is how those numbers break down. … (It’s important to note that 1960 was the highwater mark for American marriages.)

… while the Pew data shows that the rate of non-married Latinos has doubled over the last 50 years and the rate of unmarried, cohabitating parents has climbed, another new study from Child Trends found that nearly 60 percent of Latino children were being raised by two married parents. Latino kids were also more likely than blacks or whites to eat a meal with their families six or seven days a week, and those meals were likely to be cooked at home.

Put another way: when we reference the traditional, married, two-parent American family that eats home-cooked meals together in our popular culture, maybe we should start showing them as Latinos.

Read more at … http://www.scpr.org/news/2014/09/26/46988/marriage-rates-keep-falling-and-for-some-faster-th/