NEED-MEETING & Wesley used transformational thinking because churches were not providing health & wellness measures

In terms of serving the poor, I think Wesley used transformational thinking in that the churches were not providing health and wellness measures.  Wesley believed that providing remedies for those who could not afford doctors was serving the poor as required by God.  The notion of the serving poor as a work of the church was not new to Wesley, but making it mandatory for Methodists was new.  For most it was an option.  For Wesley it was a necessity.     – quote by Liz Wiggins, DMin in Transformational Leadership, 7/24/17.

STUDENT SUCCESS & An Explanation of DMin Post-seminar Assignment Parameters for 2017

by Bob Whitesel D.Min., Ph.D., 7/24/17.

Post-seminar assignment

  1.         Personal Bible, History and Theology Paper.  (250 points)

Write a 14-22 page paper (covering insights from both courses) demonstrating that you are conversant in the key biblical/historical/theological source material regarding leadership and application.

  1.   Explain your developing understanding of:
  • A biblical, historical and theological understanding of one of more of the following leadership topics as relevant to your leadership:
  • Wesley’s leadership,
  • renewal leadership
  • and/or multiplication leadership.

PROF B > Basically pick one or more of the “leadership topics” (Wesley’s leadership, renewal leadership and/or multiplication leadership) and for each one have three sections.

EXAMPLE > Let’s use “renewal leadership” as an example (though you might choose a different one or two of the others). The first section will describe your developing biblical understanding of “renewal leadership.” The second section will describe your developing historical understanding of “renewal leadership.” And the third section will describe your developing theological understanding of “renewal leadership.”

  • Tell how this understanding will inform your plan for transformational leadership (i.e. in the following Student Analysis Paper).

PROF B > Explain in each section how that section will impact your plan (in the next paper).

  1.  Synthesize key biblical, historical and theological issues with organizational understandings into a practical, historically consistent and theologically valid process model for bringing about effective Wesleyan, renewal and/or multiplication leadership in your ministry.

PROF B > A process model (which I am sure all understand by now) is a “model” or “plan” that will take place over time (hence a “process model”). This plan here describes how your developing understanding of the bible, theology and history will impact your application plan. So this assignment basically describes how you will keep relevant aspects of bible, theology and history impacting your application paper (the next assignment). So, show me a plan that you will use throughout your ministry that will keep relevant bible, theology and history aspects impacting your application plan (which is the next paper).

EXAMPLE: Perhaps you will begin a monthly reading as some of Wesley’s journals, i.e. passages that relate to one of the three topics mentioned above. Or perhaps you will delve into what the Bible says about multiplication in a personal Bible study you have with friends. Or you may decide that every six weeks you will interview a pastor turnaround church church and glean ideas. Basically you need to show a plan to keep the bible, church history and theology central in your growth as a transformational leader and in your foundation for transforming an organization

  1.  Use a title page, abstract, appendixes and citation pages (which do not count toward page totals).
  2.  Student Analysis Paper (250 points)

Write a 22-36 page paper (covering insights from both courses) proposing a strategy for applying Wesley’s leadership methodologies, renewal leadership and/or multiplication leadership for a specific ministry challenge in your ministry. Utilize the following sections (which may each be of varying length):

PROF B > This is basically your organizational plan. You want to take the ideas from your first paper and now show the practical plans that grow out of them regarding either Wesley’s leadership methodologies, renewal leadership and/or multiplication leadership.

Section 1: Describe your level of skill as a transformational leader in the areas of Wesley’s methodologies, renewal and/or multiplication along with a personal plan for growth.  Though your level of skill as in these areas has been broached in your pre-seminar paper, do not cut-and-paste ideas from the pre-seminar work.  Instead reedit, improve and expand ideas from your pre-seminar work.  Also, section 1 in this post-seminar paper must add a robust and detailed personal plan for growth.

PROF B > Be very careful of plagiarism here. You don’t want to just cite what you did from your pre-seminar paper (or even what you did for one of the doctoral courses last year). In this section you should analyze your skill as a transformational leader and how it has changed since you’ve been in England and in these online discussions.

ASSESSMENT > This section will be in each of your papers and give you a chance to evaluate how you improved from before the live seminar (this year in England) and even allow comparison between years, i.e. how your skill has changed since last year.

Section 2:  Upon the biblical, historical and theological foundations from your previous paper build a detailed strategy selection, implementation and outcomes that cites the impact of bible, history and theology upon your plan.

PROF B > Don’t restate sections from your previous paper, but rather use short phrases and citations to describe how the Bible, church history and theology will impact each of your strategic plans in this paper. Thus, you don’t want to restate entire sections of the previous paper. That can be perceived as padding by professors, meaning that you are filling up the paper with previous work to reach your page total. I know you would not do that. But, I want to make you aware that that can be a perception and we don’t want that when you go before your projects committee.

Ensure that this process model synthesizes both key theological issues and important organizational concepts.

PROF B > Again site relevant theological issues and don’t overlook them. Sometimes theological issues get overlooked because it’s easier to talk about historical issues and biblical issues.

Also, demonstrate how this outcome has emerged from an understanding codified in your Personal Bible/history/theological Paper.

PROF B > Again, it should be clear how the Bible, history and theology have impacted your plan and made it better. Use short phrases and appropriate citations to show your plan is tied back to a solid biblical, historical and theological undersanding.

WIDE BREADTH OF SCHOLARSHIP > I think you all are aware by the time you get to a doctoral level that you are supposed to be siting dozens of relevant primary sources in your papers. Sometimes students will cite as source and use it only once in your paper. If the source is really that good and it should be reoccurring in your paper many times. Your paper should be a clear example that you have taken various series and the ologies and created from them a new and exciting way strategic plan for your ministry. That is why you’re required to read 4000 pages because it is assumed that most of those books will make their way into your paper. Remember, the paper is an example of you taking what great scholars have said about your topics and apply them to your local situation. So it’s important that you demonstrate that you have a broad knowledge of Scholarship buy respective academics regarding the plans you are proposing.

CHURCHHEALTH.WIKI & The DISCUSSION FORUM PURPOSE > As I know you all are aware, you can find on my wiki dozens and dozens of articles: not just on topics from our courses, but also on APA formatting, how many citations to use, etc. Go there for the answers and if you can’t find them there then crowd-source them in your discussion forum. Chances are a previous student has asked a similar question at one time and I’ve answered it there. In fact, I will put this entire elaborated description of your assignment on ChurchHealth.wiki so you are have access to it anytime you need it.

FORUMS > And so, the forums are a place to go deeper in your application more than asking questions about the assignments. You certainly can and should do the latter in the forums, but that’s not its primary purpose. Its primary purpose is to take everything that you’re putting into your paper and allow your cohort-mates to help you focus it, find more citations and make it more likely to succeed.

Use due dates, delegation responsibilities, timelines, PERT charts, etc.

PROF B > Finally, don’t forget to use appendices to include charts, timelines and plans such as PERT charts. You want to create a visual representation that you might use to show what you’re proposing to your leaders. This will also prepare you for your final DMIN project when a visual plan will be a an important part of your Dr. of Ministry project. See more about appendices in the finaly paragraph below.

Appendixes:  Include in this paper an 11 x 17 diagram mapping the student’s transformational leadership process with suggested due dates, delegation procedures, accountability networks, and triggers that will move the process forward toward an effective conclusion.  Footnote this process model with brief descriptions of relevant theological thought that have informed each stage of one’s process model.  Note:  Use a title page, abstract, appendixes and citation pages (which do not count toward page totals).

#DMin

 

TERRORISM & People of faith should show “extreme confidence” in God after terror attacks

As Rowan Williams once put it: “For the person who resorts to random killing in order to promote the honour of God, it is clear that God is not to be trusted. God is too weak to look after his own honour and we are the strong ones who must step in to help him. Such is the underlying blasphemy at work.” – Rowan Williams, former Archbishop of Canterbury (2002-2012)

“Archbishop in terror faith plea,” BBC News, 7/9/06, http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/5162028.stm

#DMin

STUDENT SUCCESS & Helping Other Students Not Only Aids Them, But Increases Your Score Too

by Bob Whitesel, D.Min., Ph.D., 4/19/17

Students often ask how to score well in an online discussion posting. And though the parameters for each letter grade are spelled out in great detail in the syllabus (and I’ve posted them again below) students often want examples.

Here are examples: one is a student’s posting about a “worship disaster” followed by two examples of responses. The first is a poor example of a response and the second is a good example.

Situation of Student X:

…My pastor decided to add a service on Wednesdays at 6:30pm.  I would not call it a disaster, but definitely a failure. We had already added a third service on Sunday mornings and we just did not have enough room to accommodate all the worshippers. The solution that leadership tried to implement was to add a Wednesday evening service which would allow for more newcomers. The service was from 7pm to 8:30 pm.

The mistake was adding the Wednesday evening service. The reason it was a failure is because adding the Wednesday service did not do what was it was supposed to do. Most of the people who attended to Wednesday service were people who already normally attended church on Sunday. I believe it is important that we deal with our mistakes as individuals and as the church…

Response of Student 1 (a poor example)

_____StudentName____, that certainly is a difficult situation. I know that Charles Arn has some good insights in his book about how to start a new service. You might want to take a look there and see what which of his ideas might be helpful.

Response of Student 2 (a better example)

_____StudentName____, I am sorry to hear about the failure of this mid-week service. It seems to me, though, by the way you described how normal Sunday service attenders would come on Wednesday nights that maybe there was not a specific group that the church was trying to reach with this service and it was seen by the congregants as an additional time for them, not for non-attenders.

It may have been more effective if the leadership would have placed an emphasis on the service being either for a select generational, or even spiritual group as discussed in Charles Arn’s book How to Start a New Service (1997). By focusing the service on a select group there could have been mitigation and buy-in from the regular attenders that the new service was to reach new people…

Arn, C. (1997). How to start a new service your church can reach new people. Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Books.


My (Dr. Whitesel’s) response:

What Student 2 did right:

I agree with Student 2. I think the problem was that a specific outreach group wasn’t identified. And then as Student B simply stated, congregants felt it was just another requirement on their already busy volunteer schedule.

Student 2 helped Student X with the following suggestion, “Seems to me, though, by the way you described how normal Sunday service attenders would come on Wednesday nights that maybe there was not a specific group that the church was trying to reach with this service and it was seen by the congregants as an additional time for them, not for non-attenders. It may have been more effective if the leadership would have placed an emphasis on the service being either for a select generational, or even spiritual group as discussed in Charles Arn’s book How to Start a New Service (1997).”

This is the type of posting graduate students will want to utilize in their online conversations. Student 2 found reliable and valid scholarly insights on Student X’s situation and shared those with her.

The result was it not only helped the Student X, but it also helped me the professor see that Student A understood the principles of Dr. Arn’s book.

What Student 1 did wrong:

Student 1 didn’t share any ideas from Dr. Arn’s book, but rather just referred the student to it. Student 1 had probably read Dr. Arn’s book and knew it would be helpful. But as the professor, I have no evidence that Student 1 knew what was in the book.

So if a student simply points to a book for the solutions, it doesn’t earn many points. That is because it’s not clear to the professor if they have read more than the cover of the book. Now, I know that the vast majority of my students have read these books, but for fairness to all students I must see written proof that they know and can apply the principles in the books they cite. And the best way to do that is to help others.

So it’s a win-win. First, Student 2’s type of posting helps the person to whom the student is responding (Student X). And second, it demonstrates to the professor that the responder (Student 2) understands the scholarship on the subject at hand.


From one of my syllabi:

Grading Policies

Your grading policy for your course is dependent on your school and program.  Your grading policies can be found in the IWU Catalog.

Discussions

In most workshops, there are discussion forums.  These discussions focus on either a special topic or general material from the workshop.  You will be given instructions on which discussion forums apply to the current workshop.  Complete discussions individually or in study groups as instructed. Well-thought-out postings that add something intellectually to the discussion are required for a good grade. Your initial postings should fully answer the questions posed in the course interface.  Additionally, you must reply to at least two of your classmate’s postings. Postings of the “I agree” or “Me too” variety will not suffice.

In these weekly discussions conduct some outside reading in a minimum of two to three books to support your observations. This might include a Bible commentary, other books on this topic, etc.  Customarily the graduate school student is expected to be skimming a minimum of several outside books each week and bring them into, when helpful, the online conversation.  Also bring into the conversation relevant ideas from your other course textbooks.  Thus, each week the student should be bringing into the online conversation one to two textbooks and two to three outside references as a minimum.

Also be sure to reply to any followup questions posted by your instructor. These are designed to help you dig deeper into application and theory.

Initial posts are due by Tuesday 11:59pm.  Follow up posts are due by Thursday 11:59pm.

End-of-week Papers

Most weeks an end-of-week paper will be due by Thursday 11:59pm. Like your discussions these end-of-week papers should cite relevant outside readings which support your observations. Similar to the discussion parameters, the graduate school student is expected at a minimum to be skimming several outside books each week and bringing them to bear upon their weekly papers (with citations).  Also, don’t forget to bring into your papers relevant ideas from other course textbooks.

And, unless specified differently by your professor, your end-of-week papers should comply with APA formatting rules and include an abstract.

An Expectation of Outside Scholarship

Therefore for B level work, the student should each week be utilizing and citing in their weekly papers and discussion forums, one to two textbooks and two to three outside references.  Remember however, this is for B level work.  A person seeking a higher grade would be expected to do better.

Letter Grade Equivalencies

Grade
Description of Work

A
Clearly stands out as excellent performance. Has unusually sharp insights into material and initiates thoughtful questions. Sees many sides of an issue. Articulates well and writes logically and clearly. Integrates ideas previously learned from this and other disciplines. Anticipates next steps in progression of ideas. Example “A” work should be of such nature that it could be put on reserve for all cohort members to review and emulate. The “A” cohort member is, in fact, an example for others to follow. Typical interaction will be 3+ times in each forum.

B
Demonstrates a solid comprehension of the subject matter and always accomplishes all course requirements. Serves as an active participant and listener. Communicates orally and in writing at an acceptable level for the degree program. Work shows intuition and creativity. Example “B” work indicates good quality of performance and is given in recognition for solid work; a “B” should be considered a good grade and awarded to those who submit assignments of quality less than the exemplary work described above. Typical interaction will be 3+ times in each forum.

C
Quality and quantity of work in and out of class is average. Has marginal comprehension, communication skills, or initiative. Requirements of the assignments are addressed at least minimally. Typical interaction will be 3 or fewer times in each forum.

D
Quality and quantity of work is below average. Has minimal comprehension, communication skills, or initiative. Requirements of the assignments are addressed at below acceptable levels. Typical interaction will be two or fewer times in each forum.

F
Quality and quantity of work is unacceptable and does not qualify the student to progress to a more advanced level of work.

WORSHIP & Did Pub Songs Lend Their Tunes to Wesley Hymns? No, but popular songs did.

Commentary by Dr. Whitesel: When I take groups to England, a question I often receive is, “Did pub songs of their day lend their tunes to the hymns of Charles or John Wesley?”

While writing a recent devotional book on the Wesleys (its purpose is to help church members understand what the method actually is), I see three important principles about music were part of the “method” of the Wesleyan Movement.

  1. The Wesleys wanted to not only revive the church, but they also wanted to revive worship songs. Therefore, they encouraged and wrote in more engaging and up-to-date musical styles.
  2. Though Charles did not write music, only the words, he did borrow melodies from secular orchestral works (music composed for an orchestra), folk tunes and even operatic works. Thus having studied his life I know that Charles utilized popular secular melodies, but did so carefully because worship is a critical and supernatural communication.
  3. However, I also believe from studying their lives that John or Charles would not borrow the melody of a drinking song and use it as the melodic foundation for a worship song.

To understand more about #3, read this article by Dean McIntyre, director of music resources for the the United Methodist Discipleship Ministries.


Did the Wesleys Really Use Drinking Song Tunes for Their Hymns?

by Dean McIntyre, Discipleship Ministries, United Methodist Church, 7/13/15.

…There is also the deeper issue of whether the importing of secular and drinking songs into the church to accompany congregational singing would be acceptable to the Wesleys. Wesley issued three collections of tunes: the Foundery Collection in 1742, Select Hymns with Tunes Annext (in which first appears his celebrated “Directions for Singing,” reprinted on page vii of The United Methodist Hymnal) in 1761, and his last, Sacred Harmony, in 1780. What we find in these collections yields an important insight into Wesley’s musical aesthetic for hymn tunes. Here we find the simple, traditional psalm tunes and hymn melodies, primarily from Anglican song. A number of these survive in our own 1989 United Methodist Hymnal (nos. 60, 96, 142, 181, 302, 385, 414, 450, 682). However, many of Charles’s texts were in increasing number and complexity of meter and required new sources for tunes to accompany them. John made use of new tunes composed or adapted from folk tunes, sacred and secular oratorio, and even operatic melodies. It should not escape us that whenever Wesley allowed the use of secular music as from oratorio and opera he used music of accepted high standard and almost always from classical rather than popular sources. In no instance did Wesley turn to tavern or drinking songs or other such unseemly sources to carry the sacred texts of songs and hymns.

Another help to understanding what Wesley considered appropriate in hymn tunes is to be found in his “Directions for Singing.” Of particular importance is a portion of his fourth direction: “Be no more afraid of your voice now, nor more ashamed of its being heard, than when you sung the songs of Satan.” It is clear that Wesley intends the “songs of Satan” to no longer be sung. Also important is his seventh direction:

“Above all sing spiritually. Have an eye to God in every word you sing. Aim at pleasing him more than yourself, or any other creature. In order to do this attend strictly to the sense of what you sing, and see that your heart is not carried away with the sound, but offered to God continually; so shall your singing be such as the Lord will approve here, and reward you when he cometh in the clouds of heaven.”

Wesley’s aesthetic to “above all sing spiritually” simply would not allow drinking songs to accompany hymn texts.

Finally, in no hymn book, tune book, or other publication of the Wesleys can there be found any example of or encouragement to use drinking songs for singing hymns.

What About Today?

The question still remains, “What about today? Just because Luther and the Wesleys didn’t use drinking song tunes and other popular music for their hymns, does that mean we shouldn’t?”

Whether Wesley did or didn’t use drinking songs is not really the issue. Rather, the issue is why Wesley did or didn’t use them. Wesley found the close association of hymn text and tune (even commonly referred to as a “wedding”) to be of such importance that the use of tavern songs was beneath consideration. It was never a possibility. That question remains for us to answer today. Do we find it acceptable, appropriate, and commendable to select the music of drunken sailors or the local tavern for our worship? If Wesley’s reasoning for the Methodists of his time remains valid for our own, then the answer is no; and those who choose to use such music in worship should be able to dispute Wesley’s practice convincingly…

For further discussion of this topic, see Dean McIntyre’s article “Debunking the Wesley Tavern Song Myth.” 

Download the full article and read more at … https://www.umcdiscipleship.org/resources/did-the-wesleys-really-use-drinking-song-tunes-for-their-hymns


Now, (this is Bob Whitesel again) some people mention that the web is filled with references to John and Charles utilizing pub songs when, as you can see, this is not supported by evidence or the Wesleys’ practical theology.

Some point to an entertaining video by the Christian ‘acapella group Glad (I use this video in class sometimes) where they say the opposite.  Watch this entertaining video (and learn about culture from it, but not history) and then read the explanation by Glad former member Bob Kauflin.

Gary, thanks for stopping by. I agree that GLAD didn’t research the topic very well when we started singing That Hymn Thing in the late 70s. I’m sorry that it was a stumbling block for you and your friends.
We never said that the melody for “We Praise Thee, O God” was an actual bar tune. We were using the tune simply to illustrate a practice that has existed for quite some time. The Psalmists borrowed poetic forms from pagan nations, and the disagreement about what music is “appropriate” to use for the church has been going on for centuries. What is clear is that some musical styles are definitely more suited for congregational singing than others and as you said, music isn’t created in a vacuum. Leaders need wisdom and discernment. But songs don’t say the same things to everyone, and there is no one style of music that can effectively communicate the glories of God or enable us to express the range of proper responses to God.
Gary: February 28, 2016 at 9:31 AM #  Need to come clean on “I once met a girl and her name was Matilda, she hugged like a bear and she looked like one too”. being the source of a hymn. It’s most certainly a lie. It is still damaging our worship service this morning.
Bob Kauflin February 28, 2016 at 8:05 PM # Gary, I did “come clean” in my response to your previous comment. If you’re interested, I found Harold Best’s book Music Through the Eyes of Faith helpful in this discussion. Grace to you.

 

#DMin

SALVATION & A Wesleyan Order: Prevenient, Convicting, Justifying & Sanctifying Grace #Seedbed #video

by Dr. Chuck Gutenson, Seedbed, 2/26/13.

For more videos see The 7 Minute Seminary at … https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=seven+minute+seminary

#DMin

MULTIPLICATION & 5 Reasons Churches Should Balance Their Internal & External Church Planting

by Bob Whitesel, D.Min., Ph.D., 2/19/17.

I want leaders to consider “external” and “internal” planting a bit more as they strategize the future of their ministry.  External planting is a somewhat typical semi-autonomous church plant by a mother church.  Internal planting is supporting sub-congregations of different cultural behaviors, ideas and styles within the mother church.

And, we need both. But usually when you hear “church planting’” you think of the former, the autonomous or semi-autonomous church plant: organizationally and locationally removed from the mother church.

But I want leaders to grasp the strategic idea of balancing external plants with internal plants.  We should have both and perhaps even balance them: 50% internal plants and 50% external plants.  To explain why, let me share some questions a student once asked about this.

The student said, “In the Missional Church course we learned that planting a church was one way to rejuvenate a local church’s lifecycle, and promote growth. Your response makes me think you disagree with that. I see how growing an internal sub-congregation will grow the main church, but isn’t the process of loosing members to the daughter church, and the daughter church having to learn to make its own way, what stimulates innovation, change, and growth in both churches? Perhaps I am just being too optimistic. I do not know the actual statistics for church plant survival, but I’ve read that it is anywhere from 50%-80%. People seem to get more excited about planting a church than adding a new service (even though adding the new service may cause more growth?). It may also be the denomination’s mindset. I get the impression that the number of churches (especially new churches) a denomination has is sometimes trumpeted more than the number of members. Which sounds better, ‘We have 100 churches with average attendance of 100 people at each’ or ‘We have 10 churches with an average attendance of 1000 people each.’ 100 churches could mean more communities being reached, while 10 huge churches could mean more work actually being done. When I read the core values and core scores of my denominational department of evangelism it seems more directed at planting new churches than growing existing ones.”

These are important questions. And here are my responses.

1. Yes, I disagree (as does Eddie Gibbs in I Believe in Church Growth, 1981, pp. 282-284) with solely external planting.  As a consultant I see the damage it does on a local level when we create an external plant without regard to fostering an internal plant in a nearby congregation (external plant cannibalizes local churches, while birthing competitive and weak plants).  I think you can see that internal planting is much better for the rationale I outlined.

2. Plus, an internal plant can have the same amount of innovation, change, and growth as does an external plan (look at how innovative youth ministries can be).  The internal plants also create an “economy of scale” as a church grows into a larger church with multiple sub-congregations (creating multi-cultural acceptance too).

3. And, I think you are right that external planting is more popular from a denominational perspective where the number of churches trumps health.  The Church of the Nazarene emphasizes internal planting more than Wesleyans and their churches are on average much larger than ours (creating sustainability and an economy of scale = they can do more).

4. You asked, “Which sounds better.  ‘We have 100 churches with average attendance of 100 people at each’ or ‘We have 10 churches with an average attendance of 1000 people each.’ 100 churches could mean more communities being reached, while 10 huge churches could mean more work actually being done.”  Because in my consultative experience I’ve found that you need on average 175 attendees for a church to have the range of ministries people have come to expect, those 100 churches of 100 people are likely struggling and not healthy. Thus, they are usually not reaching people anyway.

5. It seems to me that in 50% of these situations it might be better for the larger church to have a sub-congregational “venues” in these neighborhoods.  The venue could be a culturally distinct sub-congregation, but would have all of the financial and staff backing of the larger church.  The business world understands the importance of an economy of scale, but the church misses it and creates networks of struggling congregations.

A name for this type of church is The Multicultural Alliance Model.

See all five models here: MULTICULTURAL CHURCHES & 5 Models: A New Paradigm Evaluated and Differentiated #AICR #AcademyForInterculturalChurchResearch