EDUCATION & Is going to college worth it? #PewResearch says Yes!

by ANDREA CAUMONT, Pew Research, 5/19/15.

A new Pew Research Center report on higher education contains a number of findings about the rising value of a college degree (as well as the rising cost of not going to college). College-educated millennials are outperforming their less-educated peers on virtually every economic measure, and the gap between the two groups has only grown over time. Here are six key findings that provide a compelling answer to the question: Is going to college worth it?

1A college education is worth more today. There’s a wider earnings gap between college-educated and less-educated Millennials compared with previous generations.

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2College benefits go beyond earnings: In addition to earning more, college-educated Millennials also have lower unemployment and poverty rates than their less-educated peers. They’re also more likely to be married and less likely to be living in their parent’s home.

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3College grads are more satisfied with their jobs: College-educated Millennials are more likely to see themselves on a career path, rather than just working at a job to get them by.

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4The cost of not going to college has risen. Millennials with just a high school diploma are faring worse today than their counterparts in earlier generations by almost every economic measure examined.

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5College grads say college is worth it: About nine-in-ten college grads in every generation say college has been, or will be, worth the investment. Despite a steep rise in college tuitions, Millennials agree.

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6College majors matter. Among all grads, science or engineering majors are the most likely to say their current job is very closely related to their field of study and the least likely to say that a different major would have better prepared them for the job they really wanted.

ST_14.02.11_236_HigherEd_Majors-MatterRead more at … http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2014/02/11/6-key-findings-about-going-to-college/

WOMEN LEADERS & Why The First Years After College Are Crucial For Women Aiming For Church Leadership

Commentary by Dr. Whitesel: “To see more women leaders rising to the top jobs in our churches, research indicates we have to convince more of them that even when looking for their first job out of college, they should be aiming for the big jobs.”

Why The First Years After College Are Crucial For Women Aiming For The C-Suite | Fast Company | Business + Innovation

BY SALLY BLOUNT, Dean of the Kellogg School of Management

…Women now make up more than half of the incoming classes in the top U.S. universities, but still only a small fraction of CEOs, board directors, and government leaders. This data makes it clear that while we’re now getting women into the game in equal numbers, we are not yet getting them through to the top.

At Kellogg School of Management, we’ve identified three critical pivot points where we’re losing women on the way to the C-suite:

  • The launch
  • The child rearing years
  • The transition to senior leadership.

Here, I focus on the launch–that critical first job after college, because the data suggests that many women may be opting out even before they start.

Recent stats from Northwestern and Harvard show that, in their first year out of college, women from these top schools are up to 50% less likely than their male peers to enter the most competitive business tracks, like investment banking and management consulting.

Yet when I look back at my own career, I realize just how important my first job at the Boston Consulting Group was for setting the trajectory that landed me as the first female dean of a top business school. At BCG, I got important imprinting in the ways of business and how markets work and began building my analytical and problem-solving skills.

If we want our best and brightest young women to become great leaders, we have to convince more of them that their first job out of college ought to be in business, and they should be going for the big jobs regardless of what career they want to pursue…

Read more at … http://www.fastcompany.com/3032946/strong-female-lead/why-the-first-years-of-college-are-crucial-for-women-aiming-for-the-c-sui

EDUCATION & California State Universities Oust Christian Organizations #InterVarsity

by: Scot McKnight, 9/9/14

While many Christians don’t like this I see something golden here: this may enhance local church ministries in university and college towns. There is no reason to moan that universities and state-sponsored schools don’t have a right to do this, for they do.

RNS by Kimberly Winston

(RNS) A well-established international Christian student group is being denied recognition at almost two dozen California college campuses because it requires leaders to adhere to Christian beliefs, effectively closing its leadership ranks to non-Christians and gays.

California State University, which has 23 campuses, is “de-recognizing” local chapters of InterVarsity Christian Fellowship, an evangelical Christian group with 860 chapters in the United States. The university system says InterVarsity’s leadership policy conflicts with its state-mandated nondiscrimination policy requiring membership and leadership in all official student groups be open to all.

Read more at … http://www.patheos.com/blogs/jesuscreed/2014/09/09/california-and-christian-organizations/

TECHNOLOGY & Use by College and Graduate Students #PewResearch

Connected college students“When it comes to general internet access, young adults of all stripes are much more likely than the general population to go online. Fully 92% of 18-24 year olds who do not attend college are internet users, comparable to the rate for community college students and just slightly lower than the rate for undergraduate and graduate students (nearly 100% of whom access the internet).

Undergraduate and graduate students differentiate themselves more clearly when it comes to home broadband access, as more than nine in ten undergraduate (95%) and graduate students (93%) are home broadband users—well well above the national adult average of 66%.

Community college students (78% of whom are home broadband users) and young non-students (82% of non-students in the 18-24 age cohort are home broadband users) adopt broadband in comparable numbers—both have higher adoption rates than older adults but lower adoption rates than students in undergraduate or graduate institutions.

When it comes to accessing the internet on a mobile device such as a laptop or cell phone, young non-students (79% of whom are wireless users) are a bit less likely to go online wirelessly than either undergraduate or graduate students, but notably more likely than the overall adult population to do so. These differences in wireless usage between students and non-students are largely driven by differences in laptop computer ownership.”

Read more at … http://www.pewinternet.org/2011/07/19/college-students-and-technology/