CHURCH HISTORY & Ryan Danker’s insightful book on why the early Wesleyan Methodists & the Anglican evangelicals divided.

“Wesley and the Anglicans
Political Division in Early Evangelicalism” by Ryan Nicholas Danker

REVIEWS

“The relationship between John Wesley and the growing number of evangelical clergy within the Church of England is a subject much in need of fresh treatment. Despite the fact that it seems obvious that ecclesiastical and theological differences in eighteenth-century England need to be located in rich social and political contexts, few scholars on either side of the Atlantic seem able or equipped to write in this inclusive way. Ryan Danker is an exception. He combines theological literacy with historical sophistication and serious research with accessible prose.”

David Hempton, dean of the faculty of divinity, McDonald Family Professor of Evangelical Theological Studies, John Lord O’Brian Professor of Divinity, Harvard University

“Challenging the ‘standard line’ that Wesley’s relationship with those evangelicals who remained in the Church of England during the eighteenth century was one despoiled largely by theological considerations, that is, his Arminianism and their Calvinism, Danker has carefully weaved social, political and ecclesiastical threads to offer a far more sophisticated and ultimately convincing picture. This is a splendid book on so many levels: creatively conceived, deftly contextualized and wonderfully executed. I highly recommend it.”

Kenneth J. Collins, professor of historical theology and Wesley studies, director of the Wesleyan Studies Summer Seminar, Asbury Theological Seminary

“This is a most welcome study, greatly advancing our understanding of the warm, yet often heated relationships between John Wesley and other evangelical clergy in the Church of England. It demonstrates that while theological factors played an important role, much more was involved in the growing divergence among the broad evangelical camp. In the process it sheds new light on continuing debates about the very nature of evangelicalism, and where (or whether) Wesleyanism may fit within that stream of the Christian community. Highly recommended!”

Randy L. Maddox, William Kellon Quick Professor of Wesleyan and Methodist Studies, Duke Divinity School

“Wesley and the Anglicans is an important and timely discussion of the context and content of ecclesial shifts attributed to John Wesley and the rise of Methodism. Avoiding easy discourses with familiar anecdotes pitting Wesley against Calvin, Danker does the historical work to reintroduce the pressing issues of church, society and politics in the eighteenth century. Anyone interested in discovering or rediscovering how Wesley initiated and sustained an evangelical witness, both within the church and outside it, should read this book. Maybe these echoes of Wesley’s disdain for settled ministry can revitalize evangelical Christianity again.”

Joy J. Moore, assistant professor of preaching, Fuller Theological Seminary

“The last three decades have seen a revolution in scholarship on the eighteenth-century Church of England. Ryan Nicholas Danker’s Wesley and the Anglicans finally places John Wesley squarely and critically within the context of the vibrant and thriving eighteenth-century Church of England that newer scholarship has described. Danker’s highly nuanced historical narrative offers a fresh perspective on the Wesleyan movement—actually, on the ‘John-Wesleyan’ movement, since Danker is also conscious of Charles Wesley’s sharply delineated variance from John Wesley’s ecclesial vision. This is a must-read for serious students of the Wesleys and Methodist origins.”

Ted A. Campbell, professor of church history, Perkins School of Theology, Southern Methodist University

“From beginning to end, Danker effectively locates ecclesiastical and theological differences within their broader context in eighteenth-century England. The result is an engaging and richly detailed account of the development of evangelicalism and early Methodism. Any readers—whether Anglicans, Methodists, Calvinists, Catholics, or others—who desire to learn more about this period of history and its implications will benefit from reading Danker’s contextualized and convincingly argued book.”

Kenneth M. Loyer, Catholic Historical Review

FROM THE PUBLISHER

Why did the Wesleyan Methodists and the Anglican evangelicals divide during the middle of the eighteenth century?

Many would argue that the division between them was based narrowly on theological matters, especially predestination and perfection. Ryan Danker suggests, however, that politics was a major factor throughout, driving the Wesleyan Methodists and Anglican evangelicals apart.

Methodism was perceived to be linked with the radical and seditious politics of the Cromwellian period. This was a charged claim in a post-Restoration England. Likewise Danker explores the political force of resurgent Tory influence under George III, which exerted more pressure on evangelicals to prove their loyalty to the Establishment. These political realities made it hard for evangelicals in the Church of England to cooperate with Wesley and meant that all their theological debates were politically inflected.

Rich in detail, here is a book for all who seek deeper insight into a critical juncture in the development of evangelicalism and early Methodism.

Read more at … https://www.ivpress.com/wesley-and-the-anglicans

DMin & Chris McDaniel of Anglican Church of North America Sharing on Missional Innovation

Rev. Chris McDaniel, church planter of the growing mega-church Trinity Anglican Mission in Atlanta, addressing 19 DMin students on the topic of “transformational leading across socioeconomic levels.”

DMin ATL Kris McDaniel 2.jpg

Read more about Trinity Anglican Mission … http://atltrinity.org/beliefs-and-practices/#

DISCIPLESHIP & Michael Breen on Outward Focus of Discipleship #KillerApp

Anglican 1000 – Michael Breen on Outward Focus of Discipleship, by Mike Breen, Dallas, http://www.anglicansunited.com/?p=12543, March 7, 2012

PLANO, TEXAS—One of the marvels of today is anything Apple. Steve Jobs and his killer apps for his Apple operating system. In coding language, GUI= Graphical User Interface. This interface makes the operating system available for the average user.

What is the operating system of Jesus? What is his programming language? The Bible. He was always referring to the Scriptures. “Verily, verily” was a reinforcement of the usual text. This afternoon, I am going to talk about the Scriptures as a programming language written in a binary code. It is the invitation to relationship with God and the responsibility of taking that relationship seriously and productively.

The Operating System is discipleship. How does he do this? He calls people to follow him; come walk with me and be my disciples. He talks about discipleship all the time. His operating system is making disciples. The GUI – graphic interface – is imprinting stories on the minds of those he is teaching, using rabbinical teaching methods.

What is the killer app? The Church.

99% of all clergy in the Ang. Communion have a different operating system. Jesus made disciples first and then got the church.

We try to build the church and then make disciples. It is very hard and not very productive. We are not submitted to the methodology of Christ, the Lordship, yes, but the methodology, no. It is unmistakable. We try to make/build the church first and then made disciples.

A disciple can be described in plain language as a person identified with the character and competency of Christ. But here’s the thing. Our methodology is more defined by the enlightenment than by Scripture. It is important for disciples to have the right information. Tremendously important that having the right information, we give them the freedom to innovate. Have a go at it.

But the means by which we get to innovation is not from information but from imitation. 1 Corinthians 4: 14. “Disciple” as a word disappears from New Testament after Acts 21st chapter. Discipleship is the great commission. No doubt that this is what Jesus wants us to do. And commands us to do it. So, why does word disciple disappear? Why? By the time we get to Galatians, the Church has travelled beyond the cultural heartland of the Holy Land. The picture, the guiding metaphor of rabbi and disciple no longer works. Who is it in Corinth? A foreigner with a n unusual haircut. That’s how they saw the disciple that came to teach and lead them. The Socratic method is familiar, but Paul has to develop a guide for the next generation. The method Paul develops is the method of the parent and the child. The leaders are to function as spiritual parents. Paul describes as non-gender specific language as father-mother and from this metaphor of discipleship, he reinforces what a discipling relationship is. Sosthenese was the synagogue ruler in Corinth. He was seized and beaten by the mob in the presence of Gallio , the Roman governor, when he refused to proceed against Paul at the instigation of the Jews (Acts 18:12-17). This event led him on journey toward Jesus. Comes to Paul for teaching and Paul says, “I am sending you my son, Timothy…”

Read more at … http://www.virtueonline.org/anglican-1000-michael-breen-outward-focus-discipleship

ATTENDANCE & Church of England decline heralds calls for innovative use of church buildings #TheUKGuardianNewspaper

by Esther Addley, The Guardian Newspaper, 6/8/15.

According to the annual British Social Attitudes survey, in just two years between 2012 and 2014, the number of people describing their beliefs as being Church of England or Anglican fell from 21% to 17%, a loss of 1.7 million people – leading the former archbishop of Canterbury, Lord Carey, to repeat warnings that the church is “a generation away from extinction”.

Britain is not necessarily becoming more godless – in the same period, the number of Muslims grew by a million, amounting to 2.4% of the population – just less the proportion of Anglicans. That has implications enough for the church in the inner city, but what are the ramifications in the countryside where, for a thousand years, the Church of England has often been the institution that holds rural communities together?..

Read more at … http://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/jun/07/church-of-england-decline-heralds-calls-for-innovative-use-of-church-buildings

MANAGEMENT & Renowned theologian Archbishop of Canterbury sends bishops to business school for more education #WesleySem

Commentary by Dr. Whitesel: “About 10 years ago the current president of Indiana Wesleyan University, Dr. David Wright, asked me to put together a book in which business school professors would adapt their subject matter for church leaders. I recruited some of the best professors teaching in our IWU MBA program and asked them, ‘Write a chapter about what church leaders need to know about your subject.’ The result was two books. The Church Leaders’ MBA: What business professors wish church leaders knew about management was published by Ohio Christian University Press. And, Foundations of Church Administration was published by Beacon Hill publishers. Read this article about how in England the Archbishop of Canterbury also realizes that pastors are weak in management and is now encouraging them to take similar training. It should be no surprise that the first course chosen by Dr. Wright for our IWU Masters of Arts in (Ministry) Leadership was nonprofit management.”

Business school bishops,
by C. S-W, The Economist Magazine, Jan 21st 2015,

The Church of England encourages its clergy to get some management education

JUSTIN WELBY (pictured), the Archbishop of Canterbury, is a renowned theologian. But the head of the Church of England is not your ordinary church chief; he has brought extraordinary changes to the way his clergy manage their worshippers. At first glance, the archbishop’s curriculum vitae might appear to focus more on things pecuniary than pious. He spent over a decade working in the oil industry, half at the executive level. Though Mr Welby does not hold an MBA, he believes that there are benefits to bringing boardroom practices into religion, and as such supports a proposal to send 36 bishops and deans on a mini-MBA course run by INSEAD, that will begin in April…

Sending bishops to business school will kickstart a ‘culture change for the leadership of the church,’ the report says.

Read more at … http://www.economist.com/whichmba/business-school-bishops

ANGLICANISM & One More Thing about Anglicanism #ScotMcKnight

by Scot McKnight, 1/19/15.

Michael Jensen, at The Gospel Coalition, briefly sketched nine things he wants people to know about the Anglican Church. I have clipped only his bold-faced points and you can read his short explanations at the link above but then I want to add one more point, something he did not mention that puts it all into a slightly different — broader — context and one I’m sure he’d affirm:

1. Since the arrival of Christianity in Britain in the 3rd century, British Christianity has had a distinct flavor and independence of spirit, and was frequently in tension with Roman Catholicism.

2. The break with Rome in the 16th century had political causes, but also saw the emergence of an evangelical theology.

3. Anglicanism is Reformed.

4. Scripture is the supreme authority in Anglicanism.

5. Justification by faith alone is at the heart of Anglican soteriology.

6. In Anglican thought, the sacraments are “effectual signs” received by faith.

7. The Anglican liturgy—best encapsulated in the 1662 Book of Common Prayer—is designed to soak the congregation in the Scriptures, and to remind them of the priority of grace in the Christian life.

8. Anglicanism is a missionary faith, and has sponsored global missions since the 18th century.

9. Global Anglicanism is more African and Asian than it is English and American.

This listing by Jensen seeks to assure folks that Anglicanism is kosher for conservative evangelicals, which it can be and should be (and sometimes quite frankly isn’t) and is not restricted to them, but I’d like to go behind these to what is even more primary …

– See more at: http://www.patheos.com/blogs/jesuscreed/2015/01/19/one-more-thing-about-anglicanism/#sthash.RHSSNUNk.dpuf