BARNABAS FRIEND & “Now I take limitations in stride, and with good cheer, these limitations that cut me down to size—abuse, accidents, opposition, bad breaks. I just let Christ take over! And so the weaker I get, the stronger I become.”

Commentary by Dr. Whitesel: I increasingly appreciate the encouraging friends in my life, who I call “Barnabas Friends.” In my coaching work I’ve found that church leaders thrive on (and need) regular encouragement. Here is today’s encouraging quote.

“…I quit focusing on the handicap and began appreciating the gift. It was a case of Christ’s strength moving in on my weakness. Now I take limitations in stride, and with good cheer, these limitations that cut me down to size—abuse, accidents, opposition, bad breaks. I just let Christ take over! And so the weaker I get, the stronger I become.”

2 Corinthians 12:7-10 MSG

http://bible.com/97/2co.12.7-10.msg

This is the guy who bought the first copy of my first #AbingdonPress book (2001) on #ChurchHealth. Jason is growing an innovative church in Fort Wayne, Indiana.

For decades Mike has been a #ChurchHealth enthusiast in his denomination. He has also trained with the SCC which I serve as VP. I love seeing leaders grow personally while they develop & grow congregations.

Hearing wonderful testimonies from former clients of #ChurchHealth in their congregations. Now accepting more clients in their No. Indiana region.

Love to hear about #ChurchHealth principles in action. Josh launched 3 successful venues from rural congregation of 80 attendees. Grew to 150+ from ideas in my book. #ChurchGrowthRegardlessOfSize #EconomiesOfScale

ARTICLES & Index of articles by Bob Whitesel DMin PhD published by Biblical Leadership Magazine.

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Going to church in virtual reality

Screen Shot 2019-03-02 at 4.04.42 PM.pngHere are some examples, ideas and cautions.
  Bob Whitesel

Understanding graffiti leadership

Millennials making a mark on the church and the culture.
  Bob Whitesel


Creating a balanced vision for your church

Here are principles for expanding church vision and meeting congregational, local and global needs.
  Bob Whitesel


4 attitudes to cultivate in a small group

Keep these in mind when leading a small group to promote trust and maturity.
  Bob Whitesel


4 biblical ways a leader can respond to difficult circumstances

One of the most vexing questions for a Christian leader is how to respond when a godly colleague or employee experiences bad things they didn’t appear to deserve.
  Bob Whitesel


How small groups help a church survive

Sometimes the bond of a small group helps the church persevere through conflict.
  Bob Whitesel


7 principles for launching multiple worship venues, campuses and times

Offering more can better connect various people to your community, but adding a new worship encounter also has its caveats.
  Bob Whitesel


What is “Wild Church” and where is it going?

A look inside more organic churches.
  Bob Whitesel


Key principles for understanding multi-cultural churches

To help our churches grow in the most ways possible, it helps to understand how we can journey toward reconciliation.
  Bob Whitesel


5 principles for making your church a haven

Here are five principles to focus your church on reflecting God’s love and reaching those who are hurting and longing for security.
  Bob Whitesel


5 ways church unity creates a powerful influence

The church is on a mission, and the accomplishment of that mission depends upon the church being a mutually supportive team.
  Bob Whitesel


2 lessons learned from failure

Do you ever think about the past, maybe even more than you dream about future opportunities?
  Bob Whitesel


Helping others navigate the evangelism journey

To describe evangelism as a journey reminds us that outreach is a bridge-building process, requiring time, patience, mapping and perseverance.
  Bob Whitesel


2 lessons from a Christian leadership enthusiast

What fills and fuels your Christian leadership? How do you keep your faith among the skeptics?
  Bob Whitesel


Understanding God’s role for a Millennial leader

Here are three attitudes of Millennial leaders about God’s role in their work.
  Bob Whitesel


3 misbeliefs about God’s role as you lead

How do you view God’s part as you live out of a leadership position? Here are three perils to modern leadership and the flaws within these misbeliefs.
  Bob Whitesel


7 tips for introducing new ideas

Most attempts to introduce a new idea will not start the church on a new life-cycle, but rather split it into two smaller groups of which neither will survive.
  Bob Whitesel


Why churches need blue-ocean strategies

Being strategic has to do with your audience. What is your strategy and who does it involve?
  Bob Whitesel


Your leadership style under pressure

I’ve become convinced that leaders have a fallback behavior on which they rely when they are uncertain, conflicted and/or under pressure.
  Bob Whitesel


Nurturing millennial leadership attitudes

How does leadership look different today? Here are three attitudes and how they could benefit your ministry.
  Bob Whitesel


3 perils of modern leadership

Leadership is an interdependent mixture of intuition, experience, and inspiration. When it comes to modern leadership, here are some obstacles that get in the way.
  Bob Whitesel


Exploring the newness people crave

People usually sense a need for change immediately prior to the point of spiritual transformation. If God intends spiritual reconnection to be a reaction to crises, then how do we help people in the midst of crisis?
  Bob Whitesel


Why I don’t have a problem with segregated worship services, if reconciliation takes place at 11:30

It has been said that “10:30 on Sunday morning is the most segregated time of the week.” I don’t have a problem with that if 11:30 is the most integrated time.
  Bob Whitesel


Spiritual transformation is pivotal in ministry balance

Transformation is not an optional prescription for the church, but pivotal upon which God intends the other ministry aspects to be built and balanced.
  Bob Whitesel


Fostering unity and diversity through learning

Creating an uncommon church that has both unity and diversity is a rarity. However, developing learners may be the key that takes your church in that direction.
  Bob Whitesel


Agenda questions to nurture leaders

Let’s look at some agenda questions that can stimulate spiritual discussion and learning.
  Bob Whitesel


Linking learners to the church community

Churches often mistake going, baptizing, and teaching (the hows) for the goal of making active, ongoing learners. So, with this in mind, let’s look at the hows of making active, ongoing learners.
  Bob Whitesel


What is the goal of the church?

I often ask my client churches to honestly tell me what they perceive as their church’s primary goal. This is not a scientific poll because these churches need to grow and they realize this (or they wouldn’t be hiring a church growth consultant). But their answers may mirror yours.
  Bob Whitesel


Locate your focus in small groups

Since large gatherings can create excitement and attention, they often overshadow the key discipleship venue of small groups. To combat this, leaders must ensure that the church’s emphasis upon small groups is highlighted noticeably in official statements.
  Bob Whitesel


What is this talk about missional?

These are missional patterns that almost any church would want to embrace. But many people first react negatively toward the missional term because it is new and they do not fully know its meaning.
  Bob Whitesel


The cure for groups is S.M.A.L.L.

When it comes to groups, the cure is spelled: S.M.A.L.L., and the first step is surveying the types of groups you already have.
  Bob Whitesel


How to avoid a church split when introducing a new idea

For 20-plus years I have studied how to successfully employ intervention events. Here are my top seven tips for successfully doing so.
  Bob Whitesel


Why small groups work

The pages of history show ways small groups have been used. Learn how and why small groups promote both discipleship and church growth.
  Bob Whitesel


3 tactics to help you tackle ministry

To maintain a healthy balance between an inward and outward church focus is to tackle ministry needs.
  Bob Whitesel


3 unmet needs that could guide your ministry

Here is the way needs of spiritual seekers are best understood.
  Bob Whitesel


Discover how core competencies will empower your mission and vision

Why do so many lay leaders roll their eyes when a new pastor wants to re-edit the mission and vision statement?
  Bob Whitesel


4 traps of ingrown churches

Slowly over time most churches grow primarily inward in their focus, rather than focusing outward to meet the needs of those outside the church.
  Bob Whitesel


 

 

ENGLAND & Churches Outnumber Pubs in the UK

This is effectively the principle first enunciated by Donald McGavran, the church growth guru, who said, “People like to stay with their own people,” the so-called homogeneous unit principle.”

by Peter Brierley, Christianity Today, 5/31/19.

Every village in the United Kingdom used to have a pub, a church, and a general store. Today, pubs (short for “public houses”) have become iconic, a popular destination for visitors to try drinks, traditional pub meals, and the cultural ambiance.

But these local landmarks are closing quickly; only 39,000 are left in England, down a quarter from 20 or so years ago. There are now more church buildings than pubs, according to recent figures announced last month by the National Churches Trust.

But the number of churches overall is falling too, just not as fast. The share of Christians in the UK is declining, as in America and other parts of the Western world. Total secularization isn’t inevitably around the corner for at least two reasons. First, surveys show that many who say they have “no religion” still believe in God, pray, say they have a soul, or even read the Bible. Second, there is actually substantial growth among certain types of churches in the UK, all in the context of God’s promise to build his church.

2017 p.1 WHITESEL WESLEY LAND & LEADERSHIP TOUR

The three biggest UK denominations—Anglicans, Roman Catholics, and Presbyterians—are all declining quite quickly. Overall, their numbers have gone down 16 percent in just the last five years, Presbyterians the fastest (down 19%). Two other major groups are also declining, Baptists and Methodists, but they are much smaller in size.

The three major denominations form 60 percent of church members, and the smaller two another 16 percent. The remaining members often belong to the types of churches that are seeing the most growth right now—many of which have a Pentecostal bent, ranging from immigrant-founded denominations to Hillsong campuses.

Their increase, although significant, is unfortunately not enough to compensate for the drop among the bigger churches, but has moderated the overall decline. I’ll share below which kinds of churches are growing the fastest amid demographic shifts in the UK.

Immigrant churches, black majority churches, and reverse mission churches

London is the epicenter for growing churches. Between 2005 and 2012, overall church attendance (not membership) in London went from 620,000 people to 720,000, a 16 percent increase. The number of churches increased by two a week, from 4,100 to 4,800. During this time, the city welcomed immigrants both from Europe and the rest of the world, its population growing from 7 million to 8 million in 10 years.

Many of those newcomers were Christians and sought a church that spoke their language. More than 50 different languages are spoken in London’s churches; 14 percent of all the services held in the city are not in English.

The trend has since spread into other major urban areas, where churches draw in fellow believers who share the same language, outlook, culture, and so on. This is effectively the principle first enunciated by Donald McGavran, the church growth guru, who said, “People like to stay with their own people,” the so-called homogeneous unit principle.

Many of these churches conducting worship in other languages are Roman Catholic. Others are “black” churches, also called Black Majority Churches (BMCs). They too are immigrants but have been in the UK for much longer, often now in their third or fourth generation.

They first came as part of the Windrush generation, named for the ship that berthed in 1948 with many from the West Indies (the Caribbean). Rejected initially by the native white churches, they formed their own groups, like the New Testament Church of God, Elim Pentecostal Church, Apostolic Church, Assemblies of God, and others.

Read more at … https://www.christianitytoday.com/news/2019/may/churches-outnumber-pubs-in-uk-london-attendance-pentecostal.html