STUDENT SUCCESS & Info on Makeup Work for Those Who Miss an Onsite Class

by Bob Whitesel D.Min., Ph.D., 11/16/17.

(Note: If you are in an online course, please see the attendance parameters here: https://churchhealthwiki.wordpress.com/2015/08/27/student-success-my-expectations-for-late-postings-in-my-courses/)

Makeup Work for Excused Absences in Onsite Courses

Emergencies always occur and sooner or later they will interfere with a student’s attendance in an onsite class.  For instance, recently on the same classroom night a baby was born (congrats Thomas), a car transmission broke down (prayed for Lee) and another student was teaching at a nearby mega-congregation.

When events happen that prevent attendance at a live, onsite classroom session, here are the parameters I utilize in my courses for fairness and to continue learning:

  1. Request makeup work by contacting me.
    • Do so before the class if possible.
      • My mobile phone number is in the syllabus.
      • If you cannot phone, ask a classmate to let me know.
    • If you cannot let me know until afterward the class, do so at the earliest convenience.
  2. If there discussion points for the week (and most weeks there are) then with my approval your makeup work is the following :
    • In 400-600 words create a “plan” to implement something you learned from the required reading and outside sources you read for the missed week.
    • This plan should be actionable, meaning you describe a “detailed plan” about how you will employ it in your ministry setting.
    • Thus, it should include time-lines, due dates and delegation responsibilities.
    • You plan should include an evaluation element to show how you will know when you have met your goals of implementation.
    • As always,  use APA style including  a cover page, an abstract and (if needed) appendixes.
  3. Submit the plan within three weeks after the missed classroom period (or ask me for an additional extension if the emergency is ongoing).

Remember, attendance is different.

If you have any questions about the Wesley Seminary attendance policy, you can find it at the link below.  Just be aware that while I can give you makeup work, I ethically can’t mark you absent if you didn’t meet the official attendance requirements in the latest catalogue (available here: http://indwes.smartcatalogiq.com/en/2017-2018/Catalog_

Online has different parameters.

Class participation is different for an online course (which occurs over a 7-day week) and an onsite class (which occurs on just 1-2 days).  Hence, for an onsite class (with its limited discussion time) the parameters must be more lenient.

As stated above, if you are in an online course, please see the attendance and posting parameters here: https://churchhealthwiki.wordpress.com/2015/08/27/student-success-my-expectations-for-late-postings-in-my-courses/

SALARIES & Ministry Degrees Are Still a Good ROI (return on investment)

Commentary by Professor B. The research cited in this article demonstrates that the ROI, return on investment, for ministry degrees is still significant. When the Christian leader factors in their call from God, a seminary education that sharpens the leaders skills not only is a good investment fiscally, but more important missionally.

5. Religious Studies/Theology

Talk about finding your calling. While devoting your life to the church and dedicating your life to the service of others is laudable, it’s not going to leave you with a lot of profit after you earn your degree. Here are three commonly held jobs theological jobs:

RELIGIOUS EDUCATOR
Median Salary: $47,957
30-Year Earnings: $2,828,502
ROI of Degree Earner Attending Public College: 75%
ROI of Degree Earner Attending Private College: 22%

CHAPLAIN — HEALTHCARE
Median Salary: $51,127
30-Year Earnings: $3,015,174
ROI of Degree Earner Attending Public College: 80%
ROI of Degree Earner Attending Private College: 24%

ASSOCIATE PASTOR
Median Salary: $61,811
30-Year Earnings: $3,645,610
ROI of Degree Earner Attending Public College: 96%
ROI of Degree Earner Attending Private College: 29%

(To understand the methodology used in the survey see the link below.)

Read more at … https://www.salary.com/8-college-degrees-with-the-worst-return-on-investment/slide/6/

STUDENT SUCCESS & What you should cite in a book or resource

Students sometimes cite scholarly sources in a manner in which it is unclear to the professor that the student can apply the tools in the book they are citing.  To help students understand how to cite a book and specifically what exactly they should cite from an resource, I have filmed this short introduction.

©️Bob Whitesel 2017, used by permission only.

keywords: LEAD 600 545 558 557 545 711 712 701 outside sources citations

STRATEGY & If You Don’t Want to Be a Boring Leader, Stop ‘Strategizing’ and Do This Instead

Commentary by Professor B: I research/teach strategy and have led organizations from churches to denominational executives through the strategizing process. And, one of the biggest missteps is to create a strategy with too many people or too few involved. By “too many,” I mean having in the room people who are there because it is politically prudent to do so, instead of having experts in strategy involved. And by “having too few,” I mean not having people in the room who are involved in front-line, person to person tactical application of the strategy. For more on that see John Kotter, in his seminal article on “Leading Change: Why change efforts fail” in Harvard Business Review. And, for another overview of how to prevent these missteps, check out this INC. Magazine article.

If You Don’t Want to Be a Boring Leader, Stop ‘Strategizing’ and Do This Instead

by Robin Camarote, Inc. Magazine, 10/30/17.

The process problem is that we approach strategic planning as a group exercise. After spending literally hundreds of hours watching groups try to think together, I can assure you that no (okay, very few) brilliant strategic ideas come out when people gather.

The people problem is a touchy one. People invited to strategic planning efforts get there because of their title and their position — not because of their insight, energy, optimism, or even knowledge of the real issues facing the organization. They’re there because they have to be…

So, what could we all do better to avoid these process and people pitfalls?

  1. First, recognize that the strategy part of strategic planning is better done upfront and individually rather than in a group. Organizations should be training their staff on an ongoing basis to build critical thinking skills, stay connected with customers and the broader industry, and anticipate problems. These skills will make them more able to diagnose problems in the company and keep abreast of what’s trending in their market. Then, instead of bringing groups together, you can challenge the managers (at a minimum — you could include other members of the staff in this as well) to state the biggest problem they see facing the organization and how they’d propose to fix it. From there, you can either set up an organic process by which managers must build coalitions of support to move their solution forward, or, if you’re the team leader, you could simply pick the solutions that you see as most viable.
  2. Second, get in the habit of creating mixed planning teams. There is no reason that the most important planning exercise should be limited to those with certain titles. They might have earned the promotion, but they shouldn’t be the default group included. At a minimum, include representatives from various tiers in the organization, including junior staff and back-office support functions. If you’re really ambitious, add a representative customer and industry expert. Bringing in external perspectives is the best way to ensure you’re not stuck in an echo chamber and that this critical planning process doesn’t become just another thing to do among your senior executives. Most people tend to be on their best, most professional behavior when there is an outsider in the room — so facilitating the conversation becomes easier, as well.

Read more at … https://www.inc.com/robin-camarote/if-you-dont-want-to-be-a-boring-leader-stop-strategizing-do-this-instead.html

strategic planning strategy forecasting strategy Wesley Seminary

CHURCH SIZE & The average church in American is 75 attendees #Cure4TheCommonChurch

by Bob Whitesel D.Min., Ph.D., Cure for the Common Church: God’s Plan for Church Health (Indianapolis, IN: 2012), p. 14.

CureForCommonChurch

The average church in North America is only 75 attendees,[i]

[i] Barry A. Kosmin and Ariela Keysar, The American Religious Identification Survey (ARIS) 2008 (Hartford, CT: Program on Public Values, 2009) and Duke University, National Congregations Study, http://www.soc.duke.edu/natcong/index.html

STUDENT SUCCESS & An annotated example of a correctly formatted APA paper #PurdueOWL

For students desiring a visual example of a correctly formatted APA paper, check out the Purdue (Go Boilers!) Online Writing Lab. There you will find a helpful example of a correctly formatted APA paper (with captions added to explain APA). You can download the APA example paper at this link:

https://docs.google.com/viewerng/viewer?url=https://owl.english.purdue.edu/media/pdf/20090212013008_560.pdf

SERVING & How the Fred Factor can change the reason teachers, teach

by Bob Whitesel, D. Min., Ph.D., 9/30/17.

In the book The Fred Factor, author Mark Sanborn tells the story of a postal mail carrier whose life changed.  He started seeing himself as serving the people to who he delivered mail, in addition to serving his bosses.

This has helped me in my career as a seminary professor.  Rather than see my job as serving just my students, I see my job as also serving the “parishioners” who they lead.  That keeps their needs in my mind too.

If you are a teacher, read this book to gain a new perspective on those your teaching must reach.