CULTURES & A Cumulative List of Cultures from My Books

by Bob Whitesel, D.Min., Ph.D., 1/29/15, excerpted from my books with page numbers and footnotes.


Ethnicity

Anglo (Change, 68)

Hispanic (Change, 68)

Latin American (Change, 51; Cure 34)

Hispanic American (Change, 51; Cure 34)

African American (Change, 51; Cure 34)

African American (Change, 51; Cure 34)

Native American (Change, 51; Cure 34)

Anglo American (Change, 51; Cure 34)


Generation

Generation Y (Change, 52; Cure 34)

Postmodern Generation X (Change, 63; Cure 34)

Leading Edge Generation X (Change, 53; Cure 34)

Builder (silent) generation (Change, 63,68; Cure 34)

Boomers (Change, 68; Cure 34)

Builders (Change, 52; Cure 34)


Socio-economic

Urban/poor (Cure 34)

Working class (Change, 51-52; Cure 34)

Middle class (Change, 51-52; Cure 34)

Capitalist (upper) class (Change, 51-52; Cure 34)


Affinity

Motorcycle riders (Change, 56; Cure 34)

NASCAR Nation (Change, 56; Cure 34)

Goths (Change, 57)

Cowboy churches (Cure, 34)

Emerging postmodern churches (Cure, 34)

Café Churches (Cure, 34)

Art churches (Cure, 34)

College Churches (Cure, 34)


Other

Ingrown and outgrown churches (Cure, 23)

General and demographic churches (Cure, 31-33)

Worship styles are varied (Change, 67)


Resources

Cure for the Common Church

Types of Cultures: Figure 2.2 pp. 34

Footnotes: Online in PDF Cure for Common Church http://www.wesleyan.org/cure

Preparing for Change Reaction

Chapter 3 (p. 49-57)

Footnotes: 1-13

  1. Here and throughout the book, I will use the customary congregational size designation as codified by Gary McIntosh in One Size Doesn’t Fit All: Bringing Out the Best in Any Size Church (Grand Rapids, Mich,: Revell, 1999), 17-19.
  2. The 2001 census in the United Kingdom created controversy when it listed the following ethnicities. These categories are reprinted there again, not to offend, but to demonstrate the broad range of possible designations and the difficulty in creating acceptable lists. Thus, the purpose of this list is simply to acquaint the reader with the immense variety (and potential controversy) of ethnic groupings.

White: British, White; Irish, White; Other

Mixed: White and black Caribbean, mixed; white and black African, Mixed; White and Asian, Mixed; Other

Asian: Indian, Asian; Sri Lankan, Asian; Pakistani, Asian; Bangladeshi, Asian; Other

Black or Black British: Black Caribbean, Black or Black British; Black African, Black or Black British; Other

Chinese or Other: Chinese, Chinese or Other; Other

  1. The World Factbook: CIA Edition (Washington, D.C.: Potomac Books; rev. ed., 2006, CIA 2005 ed.).
  2. For the reader looking for a more in-depth analysis of socio-economic levels and their influence on behavior, consult David Jaffee’s books: Levels of Socioeconomic Development Theory (New York, Praeger, 1998) and Organization Theory (New York: McGraw-Hill, 2001)
  3. Immanuel Wallerstein, The Modern World-System I: Capitalist Agriculture and the Origins of the European World-Economy in the Sixteenth Century, Studies in Social Discontinuity (Burlington, Mass.: Academic Press, 1980).
  4. Joseph V. Hickey and William E. Thompson, Society in Focus: An Introduction to Sociology, 5th (Boston, Mass.: Allyn and Bacon, 2004).
  5. See Bob Whitesel and Kent R. Hunter, A House Divided: Bridging the Generation Gaps in Your Church (Nashville: Abingdon, 2001).
  6. For an extensive analysis on the distinguishing characteristics of each generation see Whitesel and Hunter, A House Divided and Gary McIntosh One Church, Four Generations: Understanding and Reaching All Ages in Your Church (Grand Rapids, Mich.: Baker, 2002).
  7. Bob Whitesel, Inside the Organic Church: Learning from 12 Emerging Congregations ( Nashville, Abingdon, 2006), x-xii.
  8. Mike Yankoski, Under the Overapass: A Journey of Faith on the Streets of America ( Colorado Springs, Multnomah, 2005)
  9. Whitesel, Inside the Organic Church, x-xii, xxvii-xxxiii. For a detailed look at the postmodern Xer; fresh ideas for the church, as well as the differences between modernism and postmodernism, see Inside the Organic Church: Learning from 12 Emerging Congregations. x-xii, xxviii-xxxiii.
  10. Anonymous, Thunder Roads Magazine, vol. 5, no. 2 (2007): 5.
  11. For more on this innovative, growing evangelical church with the unlikely name, see the chapter dedicated to the church and what every church can learn in Whitesel, Inside the Organic Church, (76-87).

Organix

Does not have an explicit list of cultures (especially like the ones in Change an Cure). However, it does discuss “mosaic churches” on pp. 71-72 (footnote 39- 41 – see below) and 77-81 (footnotes 59-63, also see below).

Pages 71-72

  1. For more on these types of churches, see “Types of Multiracial Churches” in George Yancey’s One Body, One spirit: Principles of Successful Multiracial Churches.
  2. See Whitesel, “The New Network Approach”
  3. Ibid.

Pages 77-81

  1. Bob Whitesel, “Communicating the Good News Across Cultural Divides” in Preparing for Change Reaction: How to introduce Change in Your Church (Indianapolis: Wesleyan Publishing House, 2008), 62-68.

60.Brian Schrag and Paul Neeley, eds., All the World Will Worship: Helps for Developing Indigenous Hymns (Duncanville, Tex.: EthnoDology Publications, 2007).

  1. C. Peter Wagner traces such blending through history as an “assimilationist model” that seeks “Anglo-conformity” in Our Kind of People: The Ethical Dimensions of Church Growth in America (Atlanta: John Knox, 1979), 45-49.
  2. Such committees might include trustees, financial, staff-parish (HR), and so on.
  3. Sociologists, however, refer to this as the “new pluralism” or “structural pluralism.” See Milton Gordon, “Assimilation in America,” Daedalus 90, no. 2 (1961): 263-85.

64.George G. Hunter III, The Contagious Congregation (Nashville: Abingdon Press, 1979), 63.

  1. Mosaic is a term that has been applied to multiethnic churches largely due to the popularity of some megachurch models. See Erwin Raphael McManus, An Unstoppable Force: Daring to Become the Church God Had in Mind (Colorado Springs: Group Publishing, 2001).
  2. The melting pot imagery can be traced to Israel Zangwill’s popular play The Melting-Pot (1908) where the protagonist cries, “Germans and Frenchmen, Irishmen and Englishmen, Jews and Russians – into the crucible with you all! God is making the American.” Quoted in Winthrop S. Hudson, ed., Nationalism and Religion in America: Concepts of American Identity and Mission (New York: Harper and Row 1970), 127. C. Peter Wagner, who wrote his dissertation on models of assimilation and pluralism, defined new pluralism as “a model in which America is seen as a nation that maintains group diversity within national unity.” Our Kind of People, 50.
  3. Nathan Moynihan and Daniel Patrick Glazer, Beyond the melting Pot (Boston: MIT Press, 1984).
  4. Indiana University scholar Gerardo Marti has written extensively on Mosaic Church in Southern California (led by Erwin McManus) and believes that its multi-ethnicity is produced in part by “playing down” ethnic differences and uniting around evangelicalism. For more on Marti’s analysis, see A Mosaic of Believers: Diversity and Innovation in a Multiethnic Church (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2009).
  5. Wagner, Our Kind of People, 51.

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